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Types of Badgers

American ​Badger​
American ​Badger​

The American badger (Taxidea taxus) is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European badger. It is found in the western and central United States, northern Mexico, and south-central Canada to certain areas of southwestern British Columbia.

Asian Badger​
Asian Badger​

Asian badgers are mostly lighter in colour than European badgers, though some forms may closely approach the former species in colour, if not darker, with smudges of ocherous and brownish highlights.

image: arkive.org
Bornean ​Ferret-Badger​
Bornean ​Ferret-Badger​

The Bornean ferret-badger (Melogale everetti), also known as Everett's ferret-badger or the Kinabalu ferret-badger, is a member of the family Mustelidae.

Burmese ​Ferret-Badger​
Burmese ​Ferret-Badger​

The Burmese ferret-badger has a head and body length of 35–40 centimetres (14–16 in), a tail length of 15–21 centimetres (5.9–8.3 in) and a body weight of 1.5–3 kilograms (3.3–6.6 lb). The fur ranges from fawn brown to dark brown, with a white dorsal stripe.

image: flickr.com
Chamitataxus​
Chamitataxus​

Chamitataxus is a prehistoric badger genus. Chamitataxus avitus is the only known species of the genus. Chamitataxus lived during the Late Miocene, around 6 million years ago in what is now North America. Out of the three taxideine badger genera to have existed on the continent, Chamitataxus is the most primitive.

Chinese ​Ferret-Badger​
Chinese ​Ferret-Badger​

The Chinese ferret-badger (Melogale moschata), also known as the small-toothed ferret-badger is a member of the Mustelidae, and widely distributed in Southeast Asia. It is listed as Least Concern by IUCN and considered tolerant of modified habitat.

European ​Badger​
European ​Badger​

The European badger (Meles meles) also known as the Eurasian badger or simply badger, is a species of badger in the family Mustelidae and is native to almost all of Europe and some parts of West Asia.

Hog Badger​
Hog Badger​

The hog badger (Arctonyx collaris), also known as greater hog badger, is a terrestrial mustelid native to Central and Southeast Asia. It is listed as Vulnerable in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species because the global population is thought to be declining due to high levels of poaching.

Honey Badger​
Honey Badger​

The honey badger (Mellivora capensis), also known as the ratel (/ ˈ r eɪ t əl / or / ˈ r ɑː t əl /), is the only species in the mustelid subfamily Mellivorinae and its only genus Mellivora. It is native to Africa, Southwest Asia, and the Indian subcontinent.

Japanese ​Badger​
Japanese ​Badger​

The Japanese badger (Meles anakuma) is a species of carnivoran of the family Mustelidae, the weasels and their kin. Endemic to Japan, it is found on Honshu, Kyushu, Shikoku, and Shodoshima.

Javan Ferret-​Badger​
Javan Ferret-​Badger​

The Javan ferret-badger (Melogale orientalis) is a mustelid endemic to Java and Bali, Indonesia. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List and occurs from at least 260 to 2,230 m (850 to 7,320 ft) elevation in or close to forested areas.

Melogale ​Cucphuongensis​
Melogale ​Cucphuongensis​

The European badger is one of the largest; the American badger, the hog badger, and the honey badger are generally a little smaller and lighter. The stink badgers are smaller still, and the ferret badgers are the smallest of all.

Palawan Stink ​Badger​
Palawan Stink ​Badger​

Palawan stink badger range The Palawan stink badger (Mydaus marchei), or pantot, is a carnivoran of the western Philippines named for its resemblance to badgers, its powerful smell, and the largest island to which it is native, Palawan.

image: arkive.org
Sunda Stink ​Badger​
Sunda Stink ​Badger​

The Sunda stink badger (Mydaus javanensis), also called the Javan stink badger, teledu, Malay stink badger, Malay badger, Indonesian stink badger and Sunda skunk, is a mammal native to Indonesia and Malaysia. Despite the common name, they are not closely related to true badgers, and are, instead, Old World relatives of the skunks.

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