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Types of Bioethics

Autonomy
Autonomy

Autonomy – Introduction In practice, the principle requires respect for the decision-making capacity of competent adults. Respect for self-determination is deeply rooted in American history and imagination. We are “… a culture that celebrates the individual.” The rise of autonomy in bioethics is quite recent.

Autonomy and Informed Consent
Autonomy and Informed Consent

Autonomy, Informed Consent, & The Law February 17, 2014 Uncategorized Kerrie Yeung The idea of informed consent has evolved over the years along with changes in medical practice.

image: amazon.com
Being Faithful (Fidelity)
Being Faithful (Fidelity)

of being faithful or loyal. we should be faithful to our duties, obligations, vows, or pledges. Refers to one's loyalty to a worthy cause, telling the truth, keeping actual and implict promises and not representing fiction as truth.

source: prezi.com
Being Just (Justice)
Being Just (Justice)

The bioethical principle of distributive justice, one of the four principles developed by Beauchamp and Childress(15) of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, concerns the common good. It concerns the just or fair distribution of health benefits within the society.

Beneficence
Beneficence

In bioethics, the principle of beneficence refers to a moral obligation to act for the benefit of others. Not all acts of beneficence are obligatory, but a principle of beneficence asserts an obligation to help others further their interests. Obligations to confer benefits, to prevent and remove harms, and to weigh and balance the possible goods against the costs and possible harms of an action are central to bioethics.

Beneficence – the Duty to 'do Good'
Beneficence – the Duty to 'do Good'

In bioethics, the principle of beneficence refers to a moral obligation to act for the benefit of others. Not all acts of beneficence are obligatory, but a principle of beneficence asserts an obligation to help others further their interests.

Benefiting Others (Beneficence)
Benefiting Others (Beneficence)

1. The Concepts of Beneficence and Benevolence. The term beneficence connotes acts of mercy, kindness, and charity. It is suggestive of altruism, love, humanity, and promoting the good of others. In ordinary language, the notion is broad, but it is understood even more broadly in ethical theory to include effectively all forms of action intended to benefit or promote the good of other persons.

Doing no Harm
Doing no Harm

One Christian-Hippocratic position pertaining to the essentials of ethical medical practice has been unequivocal. There should be total separation between “black and white” medicine as described through the pregnant admonition: “do no harm.”

source: cbhd.org
Justice
Justice

Bioethics is the application of ethics to the field of medicine and healthcare. Ethicists and bioethicists ask relevant questions more than provide sure and certain answers. Ethicists and bioethicists ask relevant questions more than provide sure and certain answers.

Non-Maleficence
Non-Maleficence

The Principle of Non-Maleficence is one of the most widely recognised principles in relation to the provision of modern healthcare.

Nonmaleficence
Nonmaleficence

Ethics at a Glance Nonmaleficence The principle of nonmaleficence states that we should act in ways ... http://eduserv.hscer.washington.edu/bioethics/tools/princpl ...

Respecting Autonomy
Respecting Autonomy

The Principle of Respect for Autonomy The Principle of Autonomy is considered one of the foremost principles upheld within modern healthcare settings. It is described to maintain an elevated role within the Four Principles approach, an opinion which is hotly debated amongst philosophers and bioethicists alike.

Truthfulness and Confidentiality
Truthfulness and Confidentiality

Truth telling in medical ethics involves the moral duty to be honest with patients about conditions, medications, procedures, and risks, and this can often be unpleasant, but it is generally necessary. As recently as the 1960s, most physicians believed that patients would rather be lied to than told a horrible truth.

source: study.com