A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Bodies of Water

Arroyo
Arroyo

Some bodies of water collect and move water, such as rivers and streams, and others primarily hold water, such as lakes and oceans. The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma. Bodies of water are affected by gravity which is what creates the tidal effects on Earth.

image: minube.net
Bay
Bay

Some bodies of water collect and move water, such as rivers and streams, and others primarily hold water, such as lakes and oceans. The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma. Bodies of water are affected by gravity which is what creates the tidal effects on Earth.

Bayou
Bayou

Water Bodies. Sort by Parish ... and the water level is decreasing by 2 inches each day. ... Mountain Bayou Lake. Parish: Evangeline.

Bight
Bight

A body of water or waterbody (often spelled water body) is any significant accumulation of water, generally on a planet's surface. The term most often refers to oceans, seas, and lakes, but it includes smaller pools of water such as ponds, wetlands, or more rarely, puddles.

Channel
Channel

A body of water or waterbody (often spelled water body) is any significant accumulation of water, generally on a planet's surface. The term most often refers to oceans, seas, and lakes, but it includes smaller pools of water such as ponds, wetlands, or more rarely, puddles.

Creek
Creek

Bodies of water that are navigable are known as waterways. Some bodies of water collect and move water, such as rivers and streams, and others primarily hold water, such as lakes and oceans. The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma.

Distributary
Distributary

Some bodies of water collect and move water, such as rivers and streams, and others primarily hold water, such as lakes and oceans. The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma. Bodies of water are affected by gravity which is what creates the tidal effects on Earth.

image: earthsci.org
Estuary
Estuary

An estuary is a partially enclosed coastal body of brackish water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. Estuaries form a transition zone between river environments and maritime environments.

Fjord
Fjord

Some bodies of water collect and move water, such as rivers and streams, and others primarily hold water, such as lakes and oceans. The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma. Bodies of water are affected by gravity which is what creates the tidal effects on Earth.

image: snipview.com
Headland
Headland

A body of water or waterbody (often spelled water body) is any significant accumulation of water, generally on a planet's surface. The term most often refers to oceans, seas, and lakes, but it includes smaller pools of water such as ponds, wetlands, or more rarely, puddles.

image: pxhere.com
Inlet
Inlet

Bodies of water that are navigable are known as waterways. Some bodies of water collect and move water, such as rivers and streams, and others primarily hold water, such as lakes and oceans. The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma.

Kettle
Kettle

Fluvioglacial Landforms: What Is A Kettle? Kettles are shallow sediment loaded water bodies formed as a result of glacier retreat or draining floodwaters. Lake Matheson is a kettle lake in New Zealand.

Lagoon
Lagoon

Water from these water bodies can be transported back to the oceans and water from oceans into these lagoons through inlets that cut through the barriers that are mostly sandbanks. Being shallow water bodies, there is a lot of effect on the salinity and the temperature of the water in lagoons with evaporation and precipitation.

source: quora.com
Lake
Lake

A body of water or waterbody[1] (often spelled water body) is any significant accumulation of water, generally on a planet's surface. The term most often refers to oceans, seas, and lakes, but it includes smaller pools of water such as ponds, wetlands, or more rarely, puddles.

Loch
Loch

Some bodies of water collect and move water, such as rivers and streams, and others primarily hold water, such as lakes and oceans. The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma. Bodies of water are affected by gravity which is what creates the tidal effects on Earth.

image: pxhere.com
Marsh
Marsh

Some bodies of water collect and move water, such as rivers and streams, and others primarily hold water, such as lakes and oceans. The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma. Bodies of water are affected by gravity which is what creates the tidal effects on Earth.

Pond
Pond

A body of water or waterbody (often spelled water body) is any significant accumulation of water, generally on a planet's surface. The term most often refers to oceans, seas, and lakes, but it includes smaller pools of water such as ponds, wetlands, or more rarely, puddles.

Puddle
Puddle

A body of water or waterbody (often spelled water body) is any significant accumulation of water, generally on a planet's surface. The term most often refers to oceans, seas, and lakes, but it includes smaller pools of water such as ponds, wetlands, or more rarely, puddles.

Reservoir
Reservoir

The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma. Bodies of water are affected by gravity which is what creates the tidal effects on Earth.

image: minube.net
Rill
Rill

Some bodies of water collect and move water, such as rivers and streams, and others primarily hold water, such as lakes and oceans. The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma. Bodies of water are affected by gravity which is what creates the tidal effects on Earth.

Roadstead
Roadstead

Some bodies of water collect and move water, such as rivers and streams, and others primarily hold water, such as lakes and oceans. The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma. Bodies of water are affected by gravity which is what creates the tidal effects on Earth.

Salt Marsh
Salt Marsh

A body of water or waterbody (often spelled water body) is any significant accumulation of water, generally on a planet's surface. The term most often refers to oceans, seas, and lakes, but it includes smaller pools of water such as ponds, wetlands, or more rarely, puddles.

image: alamy.com
Seep
Seep

A body of water or waterbody (often spelled water body) is any significant accumulation of water, generally on a planet's surface. The term most often refers to oceans, seas, and lakes, but it includes smaller pools of water such as ponds, wetlands, or more rarely, puddles.

Sound
Sound

It was also applied to bodies of open water not fully open to the ocean, such as CaamaƱo Sound or Queen Charlotte Sound in Canada, or broadenings or mergings at the openings of inlets, like Cross Sound in Alaska and Fitz Hugh Sound in British Columbia.

Strait
Strait

A strait is a naturally formed, narrow, typically navigable waterway that connects two larger bodies of water. Most commonly it is a channel of water that lies between two land masses.

Stream
Stream

Water bodies are described by a plethora of different names in English: rivers, streams, ponds, bays, gulfs, and seas to name a few. Many of these terms' definitions overlap and thus become confusing when one attempts to pigeonhole a type of water body.

source: thoughtco.com
Subglacial Lake
Subglacial Lake

Lake Vostok is the largest subglacial lake in Antarctica. This unnamed lake is the second-largest. Scientists have not actually seen this lake or drilled water from it, but they established its size and existence by analyzing satellite pictures of the ice covering Antarctica.

source: listverse.com
Swamp
Swamp

A body of water or waterbody (often spelled water body) is any significant accumulation of water, generally on a planet's surface. The term most often refers to oceans, seas, and lakes, but it includes smaller pools of water such as ponds, wetlands, or more rarely, puddles.

Tarn
Tarn

A body of water or waterbody (often spelled water body) is any significant accumulation of water, generally on a planet's surface. The term most often refers to oceans, seas, and lakes, but it includes smaller pools of water such as ponds, wetlands, or more rarely, puddles.

Tide Pool
Tide Pool

Laws of the tide pool Constantly changing temperature, salinity and tides make it a difficult place for even the hardiest of animals to live. Most of the organisms found in this area are considered benthic creatures.

source: quizlet.com
Tributary
Tributary

A confluence, where two or more bodies of water meet together, usually refers to the joining of tributaries. The opposite to a tributary is a distributary, a river or stream that branches off from and flows away from the main stream.

Vernal Pool
Vernal Pool

Vernal pool. Vernal pools, also called vernal ponds or ephemeral pools, are temporary pools of water that provide habitat for distinctive plants and animals.

Wadi
Wadi

Some bodies of water collect and move water, such as rivers and streams, and others primarily hold water, such as lakes and oceans. The term body of water can also refer to a reservoir of water held by a plant, technically known as a phytotelma. Bodies of water are affected by gravity which is what creates the tidal effects on Earth.

Wetland
Wetland

Wetlands are where water is present above or near the surface of soil. The prolonged presence of water creates conditions that favor the growth of specially-adapted plants and promote the development of wetland or hydric (wet) soils.