A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Bonsai Plants

Adenium​
Adenium​

Adenium obesum or commonly known as the desert rose is considered as one of the favorite plants to grow as bonsai. Desert rose is a kind of succulent bush which is commonly found in Arabia, Thailand, Taiwan, Vietnam and Africa.

source: beabeeinc.com
Banyan​
Banyan​

Making a banyan bonsai is about encouraging aerial roots to form on bark in the upper tree and grow down into the soil. The roots that drop near the base can fuse with the main trunk, giving the tree a larger profile.

Baobab​
Baobab​

You can also make a baobab bonsai, it looks superb. Gigantic, exotic and gargantuan, baobab trees are old world plant. They can live up to even 1000 years or long and are often grown to make bonsai.

Bougainvillea​
Bougainvillea​

Your bougainvillea bonsai plants require direct sunlight all day long in order to thrive. Always keep the plants in a location where the temperature is above 40 degrees F. (4 C.). Irrigation is a part of continuing bonsai bougainvillea care.

Box​
Box​

The boxwood is prone to a root fungus which manifests itself by top growth dying back. Which is how we got the Jin on this tree. Putting it into good bonsai soil remedies that. The dead branches give us the opportunity to apply some drama to our composition. It’s early spring, and this is new growth. This is the best time to prune it here in Florida.

Chinese elm​
Chinese elm​

The Chinese elm is beautifully suited to the classical umbrella shape but can be shaped in most other styles with proper pruning alone. Insects / Pests: Bonsai are susceptible to the same pests and diseases as common house plants.

Crepe Myrtle​
Crepe Myrtle​

The Dwarf Crepe Myrtle Bonsai Tree from Nursery Tree Wholesalers is loved by many and makes for an exquisite and unique bonsai tree. The tree is originally native to Asia, and is known for the contrast between the red and silver within the slightly peeling bark.

Dwarf ​Umbrella Tree​
Dwarf ​Umbrella Tree​

The hawaiian umbrella tree, dwarf schefflera arboricola, in nature grows as a small evergreen shrub. As such, it can be easily trained into bonsai form. The roots respond well to pruning and it is not as picky about watering as many other bonsai trees.

European ​Beech​
European ​Beech​

I bought this European Beech in April 2001 from a bonsai nursery; its price had been reduced because, I was told, it was a 'little weak'. Apparently the tree had been part of a large group planting that had been taken apart the previous Winter and this was the main tree(s).

source: bonsai4me.com
Ficus Retusa​
Ficus Retusa​

Ficus Bonsai tree (Retusa, Ginseng) Care guide for the Ficus Bonsai tree The ficus genus belongs to the family of mulberry plants (Moraceae) and is the most popular indoor tree species for beginners at Bonsai.

Fukien tea ​Tree​
Fukien tea ​Tree​

The Fukien Tea is a tropical evergreen shrub originating from southern China. This plant works particularly well as a mini bonsai, but is also a great houseplant because it appreciates warm temps in the winter months making it a perfect choice for anyone in the city or who does not have the benefits of a yard.

Jade Plant​
Jade Plant​

Jade bonsai need very little water. If wrinkles appear on the leaves, the plant needs water. Trim the tree once or twice weekly for size control. Place the tree outdoors during warm months. Fertilize the jade bonsai once a month, starting in late spring and ending in the first half of fall.

Japanese ​Maple​
Japanese ​Maple​

Japanese Maple (Acer Palmatum) Care guide for the Japanese Maple Bonsai tree The green Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum) is originally from Japan, China and Korea.

Juniper​
Juniper​

BONSAI BOY OF NEW YORK bonsaiboy.com . JUNIPER (juniper procumbens “nana") This dwarf Juniper is the most popular evergreen in the United States. When we think of a traditional bonsai and what it should look like, we think of a "Juniper Procumbens Nana." It is very hardy, long-lived, and tolerates many adverse conditions.

source: bonsaiboy.com
Olive​
Olive​

The olive (Olea europea) is a tree commonly found in Mediterranean countries, where it is a tree with strong symbolic importance. You can use cultivated varieties (like the normal olive) but it is common to use the wild olive (Olea europea silvestrys). The wild olive is of greater interest for Bonsai as these develop tiny leaves.

Pine​
Pine​

A pine bonsai tree, like most trees can be created in many different styles. Japanese Red Pine The Japanese red pine, Pinus densiflora shown here, is from Japan and is now at home in the National Arboretum, Washington, D.C.

Pomegranate​
Pomegranate​

Even though Pomegranate is accustomed to dry weather, it could still benefit from an occasional misting – once a week or so. Fertilizing: From the time new growth appears in spring through the end of summer, feed the Pomegranate bonsai bi-weekly. Use a liquid bonsai formula or an all-purpose plant fertilizer diluted to half-strength.

Rockspray ​Cotoneaster​
Rockspray ​Cotoneaster​

Bonsai Tree Traing and Care Guide for Horizontal Rockspray (Cotoneaster horizontalis) is a low-growing shrub with herring-bone structure. In Autumn the leaves begin turning bright-bright red, about the same time the green berries are ripening to an equally bright red.

image: youtube.com
Sacred fig​
Sacred fig​

Although I have no hands on experience with this fig, I have read that it is somewhat more difficult to make it branch than other figs. A solution to this, that I have used successfully on other bonsai that don't branch well is to defoilate the tree before pruning. Other than this piece of advice, there is really nothing I can say about this fig. P.S. I have also found with other figs to never let the soil dry out.

Weeping fig​
Weeping fig​

Weeping Fig Plant The weeping fig is part of the Ficus plant genus (scientific name: F. benjamina) and tree like, in looks. With large arching branches and long pointed leaves, it looks attractive indoors (apart from leaves dropping).

image: bonsai.in