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Types of Brain Cancer

Acoustic Neuroma
Acoustic Neuroma

Larger tumors can press on nearby cranial nerves that control the muscles of facial expression and sensation. If tumors become large enough to press on the brain stem or cerebellum, they can be deadly. Acoustic Neuroma Symptoms. The early symptoms of an acoustic neuroma are often subtle.

source: webmd.com
Chordoma
Chordoma

Chordoma is a rare type of cancer that occurs in the bones of the skull base and spine. It is part of a group of malignant bone and soft tissue tumors called sarcomas. Chordomas account for about 3 percent of all bone tumors and about 20 percent of primary spinal tumors.

CNS Lymphoma
CNS Lymphoma

Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lymph tissue of the brain and/or spinal cord. Lymphoma is a disease in which malignant cells form in the lymph system.

source: cancer.gov
Grade I Pilocytic Astrocytoma
Grade I Pilocytic Astrocytoma

Pilocytic Astrocytoma is a kind of non-malignant tumor often found in the brain. It arises from the astrocytes, which are brain cells in star-like forms. Astrocytes are the unit cells that safeguard the important nerve cells located inside the brain and the spinal cord.

Grade II Low-Grade Astrocytoma
Grade II Low-Grade Astrocytoma

They are considered low-grade (grade II), but they can develop into higher-grade tumors. ... American Brain Tumor Association: "Astrocytoma" and "Brain Tumor Primer."

source: webmd.com
Grade III Anaplastic Astrocytoma
Grade III Anaplastic Astrocytoma

Anaplastic astrocytoma is a rare malignant brain tumor. Astrocytomas are tumors that develop from certain star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes. Astrocytes and similar cells form tissue that surrounds and protects other nerve cells found within the brain and spinal cord.

Grade IV Glioblastoma (GBM)
Grade IV Glioblastoma (GBM)

Glioblastoma, sometimes called glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is considered a grade 4 brain tumor and is aggressive. See some of the most common questions asked about the disease. Glioblastoma, sometimes called glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is considered a grade 4 brain tumor and is aggressive.

image: asianjns.org
Headache
Headache

In fact, a headache is the most common early symptom of a brain tumor. UC Irvine Health brain tumor expert Dr. Daniela Bota says you should be concerned if you begin waking up with headaches, or if your headaches have changed in type and severity.

Increased Intracranial Pressure (ICP)
Increased Intracranial Pressure (ICP)

Increased intracranial pressure from bleeding in the brain, a tumor, stroke, aneurysm, high blood pressure, brain infection, etc. can cause a headache and other symptoms. Treatment includes relieving the brain of the increased pressure.

Problems Walking (Ataxia)
Problems Walking (Ataxia)

Ataxia is a lack of muscle coordination which may affect speech, eye movements, the ability to swallow, walking, picking up objects, and other voluntary movements. Many different things can cause ataxia, including multiple sclerosis, head trauma, alcohol abuse, stroke, cerebral palsy, genetics, or tumor.

image: whyfiles.org
Uncoordinated Muscle Movements
Uncoordinated Muscle Movements

Uncoordinated movement is due to a muscle control problem that causes an inability to coordinate movements. It leads to a jerky, unsteady, to-and-fro motion of the middle of the body (trunk) and an unsteady gait (walking style).

source: scripps.org
image: dxline.info
Vomiting (Usually Occurs in the Morning Without Nausea)
Vomiting (Usually Occurs in the Morning Without Nausea)

Nausea is an unpleasant although usually painless symptom. The most common symptom that occurs with nausea is vomiting. Symptoms that are also associated with nausea include dizziness, faintness, dry mouth, diarrhea, fever, abdominal pain, and decreased urination.