A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Briquettes

Anthracite Coal (Fuel)
Anthracite Coal (Fuel)

Coal briquettes are perfect for open fires and multi-fuel stoves. Lignite coal briquettes burns with a long flame and has a greater heat and burn time than traditional logs. Find out more information.

source: coalhut.com
image: weiku.com
Borax (Release Agent)
Borax (Release Agent)

Limestone is used for uniform ashing and starch is used as a binder. Borax, Yes Borax! is used to help release the briquettes from the press, and sodium nitrate and sawdust are used to aid in ignition. A lot of experienced BBQ folks out there seem to voice concern about the borax, limestone.

Lignite Coal (Fuel)
Lignite Coal (Fuel)

Lignite also referred to as brown coal, is used to make coal briquettes that are extremely easy to light, produce less ash than other fuels and are more resistant to damp. Coal Briquette Uses Lignite coal briquettes are widely used for open fires and multi-fuel stoves.

source: coalhut.com
image: alibaba.com
Limestone (ash Colourant)
Limestone (ash Colourant)

briquette, A briquette (or briquet) is a compressed block of coal dust or other combustible biomass material such as charcoal, sawdust, wood chips, peat, or Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies.

Sawdust
Sawdust

A briquette (or briquet) is a compressed block of coal dust or other combustible biomass material such as charcoal, sawdust, wood chips, peat, or paper used for fuel and kindling to start a fire.

Sodium Nitrate (Accelerant)
Sodium Nitrate (Accelerant)

If you are targeting high end markets like USA, go ahead and use sodium nitrate as an accelerant in your briquettes for that market is willing to pay more for quality. If you are targeting low end markets in developing countries, forget about sodium nitrate. Instead, use sawdust as accelerant.

source: dengarden.com
Starch (Binder)
Starch (Binder)

Starch Starch is the most common binder though it is usually expensive. It doesn't have to be an food grade. In general, about 4-8% of starch is needed to make the briquettes. Starch sources can be corn starch, wheat starch, maize flour, wheat flour, rice flour, cassava flour, potato starch, etc.

image: youtube.com
Wood Charcoal (Fuel)
Wood Charcoal (Fuel)

Charcoal briquettes have higher caloric power than wood briquettes; they burn for longer and they produce more heat and less (almost zero) smoke. Also, they’re lighter. In order to DIY charcoal/char, you’ll require wood scraps. The best material for making charcoal is hardwood such as birch, beech, hickory, maple and oak.

image: ihb.de

Related Facts

Related Types