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Types of British Accents

Case Grammar
Case Grammar

Accents are not just regional but sometimes contain information about a person's ethnicity, such as in the case of nonnative English speakers; education; or economic status. "Within each national variety [of English] the standard dialect is relatively homogeneous in grammar, vocabulary, spelling, and punctuation.

source: thoughtco.com
Cognitive Grammar
Cognitive Grammar

A theory of grammar that seeks to characterize, in a psychologically realistic way, those structures and abilities that constitute a speaker's grasp of linguistic convention, and to relate them to other cognitive processes.

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Comparative Grammar
Comparative Grammar

A comparative grammar of British English dialects ... This second volume of A Comparative Grammar of British English ... focused on phonological or accent ...

Construction Grammar
Construction Grammar

But in British English, collective nouns can be singular or plural. You might hear someone from Britain say, “The team are playing tonight” or “The team is playing tonight.” Auxiliary verbs. Another grammar difference between American and British English relates to auxiliary verbs.

Descriptive and Prescriptive Grammar
Descriptive and Prescriptive Grammar

A descriptive grammar is built up by analyzing how speakers use a language, and deducing the rules they are following. A prescriptive grammar is a set of explicit rules for using language that are taught, or enforced, so that people will use the language in a particular way. Typically the rules are handed down from generation to generation. Both kinds of grammars have their places in the world.

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Generative Grammar
Generative Grammar

A generative grammar of a language attempts to give a set of rules that will correctly predict which combinations of words will form grammatical sentences.

Lexical-Functional Grammar (LFG)
Lexical-Functional Grammar (LFG)

Lexical-functional grammar is a model of grammar that provides a framework for examining both morphological structures and syntactic structures. Lexical-functional grammar is a model of grammar that provides a framework for examining both morphological structures and syntactic structures.

source: thoughtco.com
Lexicogrammar
Lexicogrammar

YouGov poll ranks the most and least attractive accents in the UK

The Cockney Accent
The Cockney Accent

In the 1950s, the only accent to be heard on the BBC (except in entertainment programmes such as The Sooty Show) was RP, whereas nowadays many different accents, including cockney or accents heavily influenced by it, can be heard on the BBC.

The Geordie Accent
The Geordie Accent

Geordie is a dialect spoken by many people in the northeast corner of England, particularly Newcastle and the Tyneside area. The word also refers to the people of that area. Despite several theories, nobody really knows why this region's people and their way of speaking are called Geordie.

source: tripsavvy.com
The Scottish English Accent
The Scottish English Accent

Scottish English is a rhotic accent, meaning /r/ is typically pronounced in the syllable coda. The phoneme /r/ may be a postalveolar approximant [ɹ], as in Received Pronunciation or General American, but speakers have also traditionally used for the same phoneme a somewhat more common alveolar tap [ɾ] or, now very rare, the alveolar trill [r] (hereafter, r will be used to denote any rhotic consonant).

The Scouse Accent
The Scouse Accent

This series focusses on different accents from the United Kingdom. Specifically created to give non native a basic understanding of the different pronunciation features of …

source: youtube.com
The Welsh English Accent
The Welsh English Accent

While other British English accents have affected the accents of English in Wales, influence has moved in both directions. In particular, Scouse and Brummie (colloquial) accents have both had extensive Anglo-Welsh input through migration, although in the former case, the influence of Anglo-Irish is better known.

The West Country Accent
The West Country Accent

West Country English is one of the English language varieties and accents used by much of the native population of South West England, the area sometimes popularly known as the West Country. The West Country is often defined as encompassing the counties of Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Somerset, Wiltshire, the City of Bristol and Gloucestershire; even Herefordshire and Worcestershire are sometimes also included.

The Yorkshire Accent
The Yorkshire Accent

The Yorkshire accent and dialect originated in Yorkshire County in northern England. You can learn to talk with a Yorkshire accent, but before you’re able to convince anyone you’re a native, you’ll need to work on your pronunciation and pick up a few common words and phrases.

source: wikihow.com