A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Brown Eyes

Amber
Amber

Amber Eyes: Interesting Facts Surrounding This Rare Eye Color Amber eyes are the world's most rare occurrence. The eyes present with a yellow-copper tint due to a yellow colored pigment known as lipochrome. This type of eye color is most common in Asia and South America, yet still, its occurrence remains slight.

Blue
Blue

Unlike brown eyes, blue eyes have low concentrations of melanin in the stroma of the iris, which lies in front of the dark epithelium. Longer wavelengths of light tend to be absorbed by the dark underlying epithelium, while shorter wavelengths are reflected and undergo Rayleigh scattering in the turbid medium of the stroma.

Brown
Brown

Brown eyes can vary quite a bit in intensity from dark brown to light brown (also called honey eyes). Dark brown eyes are more common in Asia, Eastern and Southern Europe, Africa and the Americas while lighter brown eyes are most commonly seen in parts of Europe, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India.

Gray
Gray

Brown is the most common eye color. Individuals with brown eyes have more melanin present, and over half of the people in the world have brown eyes. Gray eyes may be called “blue” at first glance, but they tend to have flecks of gold and brown.

source: edow.com
Green
Green

Blue eyes with a brown spot, green eyes, and gray eyes are caused by an entirely different part of the genome. Ancient DNA and eye color in Europe People of European descent show the greatest variety in eye color of any population worldwide.

Hazel
Hazel

In the first few years of life, more melanin often develops in the iris, causing blue eyes to turn green, hazel or brown. Babies whose eyes turn from blue to brown develop significant amounts of melanin. Those who end up with green eyes or hazel eyes develop a little less.

image: flickr.com
Red and Violet
Red and Violet

Red or Violet Eyes. People with albinism are often considered to have violet or red eyes. However, the truth is a little more complicated. Albinism is a condition that causes people to have a lack of pigment in their hair, skin, and eyes. Since people with albinism lack pigment in their iris, light can bounce off the back of the eye and exit the eye.

source: owlcation.com
Spectrum of eye Color
Spectrum of eye Color

Brown eyes are loaded with melanin, dark brown or black eyes—if you prefer, have even more melanin than brown eyes. Albinos on the other hand have very little to no melanin. The melanin concentration on the human eye color chart above generally increases as you move from left to the right and from top to bottom.

source: hubpages.com