A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Brown Rice

Basmati Rice
Basmati Rice

Basmati rice is a unique species of rice originating from India. Just like all species of rice, basmati is available in white or brown versions, depending on the extent of the milling process. Like jasmine rice, it has its own unique smell.

source: whfoods.org
Black Rice
Black Rice

If you like rice and you're counting calories, black rice makes a better choice when compared to brown rice. A 1/3-cup serving of dry black rice contains 200 calories, while the same serving of brown rice contains 226 calories.

Brown Long Grain Rice (Wholegrain Rice)
Brown Long Grain Rice (Wholegrain Rice)

Whole grain rice is simply rice that has its entire grain intact, which is the case with brown rice. Brown rice is not the only whole grain rice -- wild rice also fits the description -- but white rice does not fit the bill because it lacks all the grain’s components.

Brown Rice
Brown Rice

Brown rice is whole grain rice, with the inedible outer hull removed; white rice is the same grain with the hull, bran layer and cereal germ removed. Red rice, gold rice, and black rice (sometimes known as purple rice) are all whole rices, but with a differently-pigmented outer layer.

Easy
Easy

Combine instant brown rice, parsley, and black pepper in a microwave-safe dish. Place butter and lemon juice in a measuring cup. Pour chicken broth into measuring cup with butter and lemon juice to measure a total of 1 cup. Stir chicken broth mixture into rice mixture until all ingredients are moistened. Cover with microwave-safe lid.

Jasmine Rice (Thai Fragrant Rice)
Jasmine Rice (Thai Fragrant Rice)

Jasmine rice is a variety of long-grain, white rice. It is also known as Thai fragrant rice. Jasmine rice is from Thailand and thus the name, Thai fragrant rice. Jasmine rice is also referred to as Thai Hom Mali rice. It was originally named Khao Hom Mali 105 variety in 1954 in Thailand. The main feature of Jasmine rice is that it is a long-grained, white rice having a nutty aroma.

Long Grain
Long Grain

Both short and long grain brown rice feature a light brown color and a small size. Short-grain rice has a short but wide kernel and often has rounded edges. Long grain rice has a long kernel and often has pointed edges.

source: leaf.tv
image: nutstop.com
Regular Long Grain White Rice
Regular Long Grain White Rice

A: Rice with chaff B: Brown rice C: Rice with germ D: White rice with bran residue E: Musenmai (Japanese: 無洗米), “Polished and ready to boil rice”, literally, non-wash rice (via Wikipedia) This process removes virtually all nutrition that the rice could have contained along with most of the flavor and almost all of the texture.

Speciality
Speciality

Brown Basmati Rice. Emitting a heady "popcorn" aroma when cooked, this imported rice has its bran layer intact, delivering the nutty flavor and nutritional value for which whole grains are known. Colusari™ Red Rice. Exclusive to InHarvest, we rescued this heirloom variety from a seed bank and nurtured it to commercial viability.

source: inharvest.com
image: toysrus.ca
Sprouted Rice
Sprouted Rice

Sprouted brown rice doesn't contain any saturated fat, which makes it a heart-healthy choice. A one-quarter-cup serving of sprouted brown rice has 4 grams of protein, which is 9 percent of the 46 grams women need each day and 7 percent of the 56 grams men require on daily basis.

The Aromatics
The Aromatics

Aromatic rice is rice with natural chemical compounds which give it a distinctive scent. Numerous varietals of rice are aromatic, ranging from the famous Basmati to much lesser known Randhunipagal. It can be used just like conventional rice for cooking, but adds a new dimension of flavor and aroma to meals.

source: wisegeek.com
Wehani Rice
Wehani Rice

Wehani rice is a variety of aromatic brown rice developed in the late 20th century by Lundberg Family Farms of Richvale, California. It is a registered trademark of Lundberg Family Farms, the only company that grows it, and is named for brothers Wendell, Eldon, Homer, Albert, and Harlan Lundberg.

image: flickr.com
Wild Rice
Wild Rice

Brown rice has the advantage for both minerals. You’ll get 2 milligrams of manganese in 1 cup of brown rice, compared to 1/2 milligram in wild rice. There's an even bigger difference in selenium content. A cup of wild rice only has 1 microgram of selenium, while brown rice has 19 micrograms.