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Types of Brown Spiders

Bold Jumper​
Bold Jumper​

Spiders in the genus Phidippus are the largest-bodied of the Salticids. Phidippus audax, the most commonly encountered jumping spider in and around Pennsylvania homes, is found from Canada and the Atlantic Coast states west to California.

source: ento.psu.edu
Brown Recluse ​Spider​
Brown Recluse ​Spider​

The brown recluse spider is resilient and can tolerate up to six months of extreme drought and scarcity or absence of food. On one occasion, a brown recluse survived in controlled captivity for over five seasons without any food at all. Behavior. A brown recluse's stance on a flat surface is usually with all legs radially extended.

Cellar Spiders​
Cellar Spiders​

The cellar spider is often found in damp locations like basements, crawl spaces and cellars, which is how it got its common name. Male and female cellar spiders may be found in climate-controlled structures year round. Webs The web of the cellar spider is irregular, with no discernable pattern.

source: orkin.com
image: bugguide.net
Cheiracanthium ​Inclusum​
Cheiracanthium ​Inclusum​

C. inclusum gets its two common names (yellow sac and black-footed spider) from its appearance. It is a pale yellow-beige colour with dark brown markings on its palps, chelicerae (jaws) and on the ends of its tarsi (feet). There is also often an orange-brown stripe running down the top-centre of its abdomen.

Common ​House Spider​
Common ​House Spider​

Brown house spiders have long, thin legs that are dark brown or black for the adult females and light brown or reddish for the adult males. Steatoda grossa is also known as the brown house spider, the cupboard spider, the dark comb-footed spider and the false black widow.

source: orkin.com
Crab Spiders​
Crab Spiders​

Characteristics: Crab spiders are named for their crablike appearance and movements. Body: Crab spiders have two large, strong front legs that are used to grasp prey. They scuttle sideways with their hind legs, although some species do move like other spiders.

source: orkin.com
image: bugguide.net
Fishing ​Spiders​
Fishing ​Spiders​

A variety of spiders are adapted for live on and around water. Many of these are called fishing spiders. Several have the ability to run across the water’s surface. Some build webs, others do not.

image: bugguide.net
Furrow Spider​
Furrow Spider​

Like all spiders, the furrow is venomous. That is, they use venom to paralyze their prey. However, you’d have to work pretty hard to be bitten, and the amount of venom is so miniscule as to be much less dangerous than, say, a bee sting.

Grass Spiders​
Grass Spiders​

If you find a brown spider on a web out in the open, it is not a brown recluse. Unlike the various brown web-building spiders shown above, each with their different types of web, brown recluse spiders do not use silk for prey capture. They do build small irregular silk retreats in which they hide during the day.

Jumping ​Spider​
Jumping ​Spider​

Jumping spiders are particularly abundant in grassland and prairie environments. Jumping house spiders also enter indoor habitats by being accidentally carried in on plants or a person. These arachnids can be found in yards as well as inside and surrounding barns and houses.

source: orkin.com
image: bugguide.net
Orb-Weaver ​Spiders​
Orb-Weaver ​Spiders​

Some spiders are poisonous while others may help kill pests in your yard. You can differentiate potentially dangerous brown window spiders from helpful orb-weaver spiders by distinctive adaptations in life cycles, what they eat, habitat, venom and general lifestyle.

Rabid Wolf ​Spider​
Rabid Wolf ​Spider​

A Grumpy Spider. As mentioned, the Rabid Wolf Spider is one of the most common spiders in the United States of America and as such they have adapted to a wide variety of environments. This particular spider has a tough time staying in one location and is known to wander from spot to spot for most of their lives.

image: flickr.com
Spotted ​Orbweaver​
Spotted ​Orbweaver​

The bite of most spiders, including spotted western orb weavers, usually results in minor reddening, swelling, itching and pain. Black widow and brown recluse spiders are the two obvious exceptions -- their bites can require medical attention -- although death is off the table for most healthy adults.

image: flickr.com
Widow ​Spiders​
Widow ​Spiders​

What is the Brown Widow Spider? You've probably heard of the black widow spider, and you probably know that the bite from one of these spiders can kill you. The brown widow spider, Latrodectus geometricus, is an arachnid closely related to the deadly black widow, Latrodectus macrons.

source: dengarden.com
Wolf Spider​
Wolf Spider​

Wolf spiders are common throughout the United States, especially Missouri, Texas, and California. In California, they are sometimes referred to as California wolf spiders.The Kauai cave wolf spider (Adelocosa anops) inhabits the caves of Hawaii’s Kauai Island.

source: orkin.com
Woodlouse​
Woodlouse​

Some other spiders that are not brown recluses, like the woodlouse hunter Dysdera crocata, also only have only 6 eyes, but they are arranged differently (not to mention D. crocata is red or pinkish or orangish in colour, not brown).