A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Business Expenses

Accounting Expenditures
Accounting Expenditures

In accounting, the word "expenditure" is used to indicate a cost that a company pays to acquire equipment or other assets. Expenditures can also reduce liabilities or be disbursed to owners. They can be considered a type of expense, but expenses and expenditures are listed differently on income ...

source: reference.com
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Advertising, Marketing, and Promotion
Advertising, Marketing, and Promotion

Advertising is often considered paying to deliver and control a marketing message, while promotion is paying to support your marketing efforts more generically. Depending on your accounting goals, you may lump all marketing expenses, such as advertising, promotions and public relations, under one expense category.

Benefits, Continuing Education, or Training
Benefits, Continuing Education, or Training

Many employers provide educational benefits for employees. Some of these benefits are for continuing education, to maintain professional licenses, or to gain new skills, credentials, or degrees to benefit both the employee and employer. Self-employed business owners also may be able to deduct education expenses.

Depreciation of Fixed Assets Assigned to non
Depreciation of Fixed Assets Assigned to non

In accounting terms, depreciation is defined as the reduction of recorded cost of a fixed asset in a systematic manner until the value of the asset becomes zero or negligible. An example of fixed assets are buildings, furniture, office equipment, machinery etc..

Fees, Dues, and Subscriptions
Fees, Dues, and Subscriptions

Use other words to describe the deduction—for example, if you’re deducting membership dues for a trade organization, list the expense as “trade association membership fees.” You may also deduct as a business expense subscriptions to professional, technical, and trade journals that deal with your business field.

source: nolo.com
Insurance Costs
Insurance Costs

Business Expenses insurance is a financial back up plan for your business. It gives you the confidence to seize life's possibilities knowing that you've got a plan in place to keep the business running if you're unable to work.

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Labor
Labor

The labor costs involved in your business can be fixed costs -- meaning they always stay the same -- or they can be variable costs that change dependent upon other factors. Determining your total labor expense is a straightforward process involving mathematics based on your detailed recordkeeping.

Legal Fees
Legal Fees

Starting a Business. Legal and accounting fees that you pay to start a business are deductible only as business start-up expenses. You can deduct $5,000 of start-up expenses the first year you’re in business and any excess amounts over 180 months. The same holds true for incorporation fees or fees that you pay to form a partnership or LLC.

source: nolo.com
Office Equipment and Supplies
Office Equipment and Supplies

Office expenses and office supplies are different tax deductions when filing a business tax return with the IRS. Consider office expenses as regular bills, such as utilities, and major equipment purchases with a long useful life. Office supplies, by comparison, are routinely used and purchased.

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Office Supplies
Office Supplies

Office expenses include anything involved in keeping your business office running. Office supplies such as paper clips can be classified either as office expenses or as general supplies. Office supplies such as paper clips can be classified either as office expenses or as general supplies.

Other Insurance
Other Insurance

Insurance - Generally, you can deduct the ordinary and necessary cost of insurance as a business expense, if it is for your trade, business, or profession. This list is not all inclusive of the types of business expenses that you can deduct.

source: irs.gov
Property Taxes
Property Taxes

Taxes - You can deduct various federal, state, local, and foreign taxes directly attributable to your trade or business as business expenses. Insurance - Generally, you can deduct the ordinary and necessary cost of insurance as a business expense, if it is for your trade, business, or profession.

source: irs.gov
Rent Costs for non-Production Facilities
Rent Costs for non-Production Facilities

The facilities expenses are what it costs you to run and maintain your business operations, and the operating expenses are recorded individually in your accounting records. Under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, the facilities expenses are reported on your income statement.

Rent, Utilities, and Phones
Rent, Utilities, and Phones

utilities expense definition. Under the accrual basis of accounting, this account reports the cost of the electricity, heat, sewer, and water used during the period indicated in the heading of the income statement.

Repair Costs for non-Production Facilities
Repair Costs for non-Production Facilities

Note: Finance-related costs may be excluded from the operating expenses definition, on the grounds that they are not generated by the ongoing operations of a business. If these costs were to be included, examples would include auditor fees, bank fees, debt placement costs, and interest expense.

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