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Types of Cabernet

Cabernet Franc
Cabernet Franc

Cabernet Franc is lighter than Cabernet Sauvignon, making a bright pale red wine that contributes finesse and lends a peppery perfume to blends with more robust grapes. Depending on the growing region and style of wine, additional aromas can include tobacco, raspberry, bell pepper, cassis, and violets.

Cabernet Sauvignon
Cabernet Sauvignon

Cabernet Sauvignon is the most popular red wine with a big bold taste that is stronger than Vs. Merlot. Learn why it is America’s favorite red wine. Merlot. Learn why it is America’s favorite red wine.

source: vinepair.com
image: decero.com
GewüRztraminer (Gah-Vurtz-tra-Meener) A Very Aromatic Variety
GewüRztraminer (Gah-Vurtz-tra-Meener) A Very Aromatic Variety

Gewürztraminer is one of the most pungent wine varietals, easy for even the beginning taster to recognize by its heady, aromatic scent. Gewürztraminer Don't be intimidated by the Gewürztraminer pronunciation: It's worth muddling through the name to sample these superbly rich and excitingly dry, off-dry and sweet wines.

source: en.mimi.hu
Merlot
Merlot

Both Merlot and Cabernet were born in Bordeaux, France and they quickly came to dominate the famous wine region, though depending on what side of the Gironde river you live on, you’re more likely to grow more Cabernet or more Merlot.

source: vinepair.com
Pinot Noir
Pinot Noir

Overall, Pinot Noir rates better according to Vivino users, but there is probably a basic reason for this: Cabernet Sauvignon is often blended in lower-quality red wines, so these blends weigh down how users actually feel about Cab.

source: vivino.com
Riesling (Rees-Ling)
Riesling (Rees-Ling)

Cabernet Sauvignon is a red grape varietal known for its thick, durable skin, and the vine’s resistance to the elements. After the birth of the grape, the Cabernet Sauvignon varietal began to be adopted in parts of France by winemakers searching for more durable plants that were relatively easy to grow, and the grape found its champion in the region of Bordeaux.

source: vinepair.com
Sauvignon Blanc
Sauvignon Blanc

In the seventeenth century in southwestern France, an accidental breeding occurred between a red Cabernet Franc grape plant and a white Sauvignon Blanc grape plant and thus was born the most popular grape among American wine drinkers: Cabernet Sauvignon. Cabernet Sauvignon is a red grape varietal known for its thick, durable skin, and the vine’s resistance to the elements.

source: vinepair.com
Sauvignon Blanc (So-vee-Nyon Blah)
Sauvignon Blanc (So-vee-Nyon Blah)

Food-Wine Pairing. Matching food with wine. STUDY. PLAY. Riesling (Rees-ling) dry versions go well with fish, chicken and pork dishes. Gewürztraminer (Gah-vurtz-tra-meener) ideal for sipping and with Asian food, pork and grilled sausages. Chardonnay (Shar-doe-nay) a good choice for fish and chicken dishes. Sauvignon blanc (So-vee-nyon Blah) a versatile food wine for seafood, poultry, and ...

source: quizlet.com
Syrah
Syrah

Cabernet Sauvignon is a red grape varietal known for its thick, durable skin, and the vine’s resistance to the elements. After the birth of the grape, the Cabernet Sauvignon varietal began to be adopted in parts of France by winemakers searching for more durable plants that were relatively easy to grow, and the grape found its champion in the region of Bordeaux.

source: vinepair.com
image: decero.com

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