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Types of Cancer Cells

Acoustic Neuroma
Acoustic Neuroma

Acoustic neuroma tumors begin in what are called Schwann cells. These cells make myelin, which is the material that insulates and protects the nerves throughout your body. Most acoustic neuromas begin in the vestibular nerve, which helps you keep your balance.

source: mskcc.org
Bladder Cancer
Bladder Cancer

Squamous cell carcinoma: In the United States, only about 1% to 2% of bladder cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. Under a microscope, the cells look much like the flat cells that are found on the surface of the skin.

source: cancer.org
image: webmd.com
Brain Cancer
Brain Cancer

Types of Brain Cancer. Brain tumors are abnormal growths of cells in the brain.. Although such growths are popularly called brain tumors, not all brain tumors are cancer. ...

source: webmd.com
Breast Cancer
Breast Cancer

Breast cancer occurs almost entirely in women, but men can get breast cancer, too. Cells in nearly any part of the body can become cancer and can spread to other areas. To learn more about cancer and how all cancers start and spread, see Cancer Basics. Where breast cancer starts. Breast cancers can start from different parts of the breast.

source: cancer.org
image: abc.net.au
Cells of the Blood and Lymphatic System
Cells of the Blood and Lymphatic System

The lymphatic system is similar to the blood circulation. The lymph vessels branch through all parts of the body like the arteries and veins that carry blood. But the lymphatic system tubes are much finer and carry a colourless liquid called lymph. The lymph contains a high number of a type of white blood cells called lymphocytes. These cells fight infection and destroy damaged or abnormal cells.

Cervical Cancer
Cervical Cancer

Although cervical cancers start from cells with pre-cancerous changes (pre-cancers), only some of the women with pre-cancers of the cervix will develop cancer. It usually takes several years for cervical pre-cancer to change to cervical cancer, but it also can happen in less than a year.

source: cancer.org
image: fhcrc.org
Chordoma
Chordoma

Radiation -- high energy X-rays -- can kill any cancer cells that are left behind after surgery. This lowers the chance that the cancer will return. Still, chordoma often comes back after treatment.

source: webmd.com
CNS Lymphoma
CNS Lymphoma

Central nervous system lymphoma is a rare non-Hodgkin lymphoma in which malignant (cancer) cells from lymph tissue form in the brain and/or spinal cord (primary CNS) or spread from other parts of the body to the brain and/or spinal cord (secondary CNS).

source: lls.org
Connective Tissue Cells
Connective Tissue Cells

The main types of cancer. Our bodies are made up of billions of cells. The cells are so small that we can only see them under a microscope. Cells group together to make up the tissues and organs of our bodies. They are very similar but vary in some ways b

Epithelial Cells
Epithelial Cells

The type of cancer is generally based on the part of your body and the type of cell where the cancer first developed. The most common places for cancer to develop are the skin, lungs, breasts, prostate, colon and rectum. There are three main types of cell where cancer develops: Epithelial cells.

Grade I – Pilocytic Astrocytoma
Grade I – Pilocytic Astrocytoma

Pilocytic Astrocytoma is a kind of non-malignant tumor often found in the brain. It arises from the astrocytes, which are brain cells in star-like forms. Astrocytes are the unit cells that safeguard the important nerve cells located inside the brain and the spinal cord.

Grade II – Low-Grade Astrocytoma
Grade II – Low-Grade Astrocytoma

It is grade IV. Grade I or II astrocytoma: In children, this low-grade tumor occurs anywhere in the brain. The most common astrocytoma among children is juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma. It's grade I. Ependymoma: The tumor arises from cells that line the ventricles or the central canal of the spinal cord. It's most commonly found in children and young adults. It can be grade I, II, or III.

source: abc2.org
Grade III – Anaplastic Astrocytoma
Grade III – Anaplastic Astrocytoma

Grade III astrocytoma: It's sometimes called a high-grade or an anaplastic astrocytoma. Grade IV astrocytoma: It may be called a glioblastoma (GBM) or malignant astrocytic glioma. Oligodendroglioma: The tumor arises from cells that make the fatty substance that covers and protects nerves. It usually occurs in the cerebrum. It's most common in middle-aged adults. It can be grade II or III.

source: abc2.org
Grade IV – Glioblastoma (GBM)
Grade IV – Glioblastoma (GBM)

Glioblastoma is a type of astrocytoma, a cancer that forms from star-shaped cells in the brain called astrocytes. In adults, this cancer usually starts in the cerebrum, the largest part of your brain.

source: webmd.com
Lung Cancer
Lung Cancer

For example, breast cancer that spreads to and forms a metastatic tumor in the lung is metastatic breast cancer, not lung cancer. Under a microscope, metastatic cancer cells generally look the same as cells of the original cancer.

source: cancer.gov
image: pbs.org
Melanoma
Melanoma

Melanoma skin cancers. Melanoma is a cancer that begins in the melanocytes. Other names for this cancer include malignant melanoma and cutaneous melanoma. Most melanoma cells still make melanin, so melanoma tumors are usually brown or black. But some melanomas do not make melanin and can appear pink, tan, or even white.

source: cancer.org
image: dddmag.com
Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (also known as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, NHL, or sometimes just lymphoma) is a cancer that starts in white blood cells called lymphocytes, which are part of the body’s immune system.

source: cancer.org
Ovarian Cancer
Ovarian Cancer

Each ovarian cancer is given a grade, based on how much the tumor cells look like normal tissue: Grade 1 epithelial ovarian carcinomas look more like normal tissue and tend to have a better prognosis (outlook).

source: cancer.org