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Types of co Teaching

Alternative Teaching
Alternative Teaching

5 Co-teaching Formats. While different teachers implement co-teaching somewhat differently to meet the needs of their integrated instructional styles, it is generally agreed that there are five formats that cover the majority of co-teaching situations.

One Teach, One Assist
One Teach, One Assist

One Teach, One Assist Model Overview: One teacher leads the whole group, while the other teacher supports individual students within the whole group. Click image for reference.

One Teach, One Observe
One Teach, One Observe

Although the name “One Teach, One Observe” implies that one teacher is teaching while the other is observing, my co-teacher and I have found that both teachers are able to observe during the student work time portion of some lessons, yielding complementary data.

Parallel Teaching
Parallel Teaching

Parallel Teaching: Benefits. Co-planning – Two heads are better than one. Allows teachers to work with smaller groups. Each co-teacher has the comfort level of working separately to teach the same lesson. Can separate students who feed off each other.

Station Teaching
Station Teaching

Station Teaching. Implementation: Each teacher works with a small group of children who rotate among various stations to complete the different tasks related to the same instructional content/objective. Station Teaching is an efficient use of time that allows all students to experience multiple related instructional activities.

Team Teaching
Team Teaching

Co-teaching is one way schools make sure that students who need special education services are being taught in the least restrictive environment (LRE). And for most kids with learning and attention issues, the LRE is the general education classroom. Here’s what you need to know about collaborative team teaching. What Is Collaborative Team Teaching? Collaborative team teaching often occurs in inclusion classrooms.

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