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Types of Coffee

Arabica Coffee
Arabica Coffee

Contrariwise, Arabica coffee beans are fragile and must grow in cool, subtropical climates. Arabica beans also need a lot of moisture, rich soil, shade and sun. Because of their fragility, Arabica beans are vulnerable to attack from various pests and can be damaged by cold temperatures or poor handling.

Bourbon Coffee
Bourbon Coffee

Bourbon coffee was first produced in Réunion, which was known as Île Bourbon before 1789. It was later taken by the French to mainland Africa and to Latin America. Bourbon grows best at heights between 1,100 and 2,000 meters and gives a 20-30% higher yield than Typica, but produces a similar quality of coffee.

Geisha
Geisha

Geisha is an original variety of coffee that was discovered in the 1930s in the mountains around the Southwestern town of Gesha, Ethiopia. Geisha trees grow tall and can be distinguished by their beautiful and elongated leaves.

Guadeloupe Bonifieur
Guadeloupe Bonifieur

The Guadeloupe Bonifieur is a variety of coffee grown in Guadeloupe. Guadeloupe Bonifieur is the ancestor of Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee [citation needed] and is very rare. The fresh air, high altitude, and abundance of rain create ideal conditions for growing this Arabica variety.

Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee
Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee

Blue Mountain Coffee Is Jamaica's Tasty Bean But Beware Of Those Pushing Fake Blends. Click Here To Find out More About This Beautiful Coffee Bean.

Kapeng Barako
Kapeng Barako

Kapeng barako. Kape Barako, also spelled Baraco (English: Barako coffee) is a coffee varietal grown in the Philippines, particularly in the provinces of Batangas and Cavite. It belongs to the species Coffea liberica. The term is also used to refer to all coffee coming from those provinces.

image: astig.ph
Kona Coffee
Kona Coffee

If you're looking for authentic Kona coffee, you want to look for the words 100% Kona coffee the label. These are the official products from the Kona District and are the only true Kona coffee products, produced by the family farms on the slopes of Hualalai and Muanu Loa on the Big Island of Hawaii.

source: coffee.org
Maragogipe Coffee
Maragogipe Coffee

Maragogipe (also called elephant bean) is a variety of arabica that produces an extremely large, rather porous bean. It is a mutant that spontaneously appeared in Brazil, almost as though the giant of Latin-America thought regular beans were too puny and produced something in its own image.

Molokai Coffee
Molokai Coffee

Moloka‘i Coffee refers to coffee grown, processed and roasted on the island of Moloka'i in Maui County, Hawai ...

Monsooned Malabar
Monsooned Malabar

Monsooned Malabar, also known as Monsoon Malabar, is a process applied to coffee beans. The harvested coffee seeds are exposed to the monsoon rain and winds for a period of about three to four months, causing the beans to swell and lose the original acidity, resulting in a flavor profile with a practically neutral pH balance.

Peaberry
Peaberry

Peaberry, known in Spanish as caracolillo, is a type of coffee bean. Normally the fruit ("cherry") of the coffee plant contains two seeds ("beans") that develop with flattened facing sides, but sometimes only one of the two seeds is fertilized, and the single seed develops with nothing to flatten it.

Robusta Coffee
Robusta Coffee

10 differences Between Robusta & Arabica Coffee September 19, 2014. You may have noticed that some coffee bag labels brag about the fact that their coffee beans are 100% Arabica.

S795 Coffee
S795 Coffee

The resultant S795 cultivar exhibits rust resistance, high yield, and a good cup profile, making it a highly desirable cultivar. S795 is widely planted in India and Indonesia. In India, it represents 25-30% of the acreage of arabica coffee.

Single-Origin Coffee
Single-Origin Coffee

Single-origin coffee is in. Sourcing coffees from one location, whether a country, region farm or lot, is a relatively new, but strong trend. At Driftaway Coffee, we’re both grateful for and shaped by this coffee-drinking trend of the past decade or so, because we wouldn’t be in business if people didn’t start seeking out single-origin coffees.

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