A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Colonoscopy

Bowel Preparation: Diet Description:
Bowel Preparation: Diet Description:

What Happens After a Colonoscopy? After your colonoscopy: You will stay in a recovery room for about 30 minutes for observation; You may feel some cramping or a sensation of having gas, but this usually passes quickly; You can resume your normal diet; Read your discharge instructions carefully.

source: webmd.com
Bowel Preparation: Laxatives: Magnesium Citrate Bisacodyl
Bowel Preparation: Laxatives: Magnesium Citrate Bisacodyl

four (4) Dulcolax (overnight or laxative) tablets with glass of water or clear liquids. Step 3: 2 hours after taking the Dulcolax tablets, Drink the second 10 oz bottle of Magnesium Citrate • Bowel movements usuallystart within 1 or 2 hoursafter you begin drinking and continue for after you finish.

Bowel Preparation: Oral Sodium Phosphate Tablets
Bowel Preparation: Oral Sodium Phosphate Tablets

Oral sodium phosphate (NaP) is one of the most commonly used bowel preparations and is associated with considerable water and electrolyte shifts. In this Practice Point commentary, we discuss the findings and limitations of a retrospective study conducted by Singal et al. that investigated the renal safety of bowel preparation with oral NaP or polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution in patients undergoing colonoscopy.

source: medscape.com
Bowel Preparation: Oral Soldium Phosphate (OSP) Solution
Bowel Preparation: Oral Soldium Phosphate (OSP) Solution

Bowel Preparation: Oral soldium phosphate (OSP) solution. Brand names: Fleet Phospho-soda, EZ-Prep, Fleet Accu-prep Description: Two small doses of OSP solution are diluted in 8 ounces of fluid and area taken 10 to 12 hours apart. Each dose must be followed by 16 ounces or more of liquid. You must get adequate liquids during the preparation and after the colonoscopy.

image: medscape.org
Colonoscopy
Colonoscopy

There may be some diet or fluid restrictions before you have a colonoscopy, but this will vary according to your doctor's instructions. You may be asked to limit or eliminate solid foods for a few days before the test.

source: webmd.com
Corn, Broccoli, Cabbage, Beans, or Peas
Corn, Broccoli, Cabbage, Beans, or Peas

American College of Gastroenterology: “Colonoscopy.” Colon Cancer Coalition: “How Not to Dread a Colonoscopy.” Colon Cancer Alliance: “Sample Six-Day Colonoscopy Prep Guide.” Harvard Medical School Harvard Health Publications: “Preparing for a colonoscopy.” Johnson, D. , September 2014.

source: webmd.com
image: meijer.com
Flexible Sigmoidoscopy
Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

A colonoscopy examines the entire colon, while a sigmoidoscopy covers only the lower part of the colon, also known as the rectum and sigmoid colon. A sigmoidoscopy is a less invasive screening test. The bowel prep is less complicated.

source: scripps.org
Fruit With Seeds or Peel
Fruit With Seeds or Peel

... seeds, granola • fruit with skin or seeds ... Low-Fiber Diet for Colonoscopy Preparation ... • Cucumbers without seeds or peel NO raw, skin, seeds, peel; ...

Hemoccult
Hemoccult

Hemoccult Test This simple test checks for the presence of hidden blood in a patient's stool. You only need to send a small stool sample to a lab, using a special card. However, the test has its drawbacks.

image: youtube.com
Raw Vegetables
Raw Vegetables

Avoid all raw vegetables when prepping for a colonoscopy, advises MayoClinic.com. Often, you must avoid all solid foods, including vegetables, one to two days before the procedure. Consuming a clear liquid diet is recommended along with transparent beverages.

Seeds, Nuts, or Popcorn
Seeds, Nuts, or Popcorn

Nuts and seeds become caught in these folds and are not properly digested. The endoscope can suck up the nuts, which clogs the instrument and may even damage it. For a successful colonoscopy, you want your colon as clean as possible so the doctor can easily detect any polyps.

Tough Meat
Tough Meat

A colonoscopy is a screening test, typically done under general anesthesia. It’s used to detect potential health problems in the colon, such as polyps (small growths which may become cancerous), and colorectal cancer.

Whole Grains
Whole Grains

Whole grains, raw vegetables and fruit, dried fruit, nuts, seeds, berries, corn and popcorn must all be avoided. While these foods normally comprise a healthy diet and actually help to protect against colon problems like diverticulosis, the very qualities that make them healthful also make them incompatible with colonoscopy cameras.