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Types of Consistency

Cache Consistency
Cache Consistency

As far as I know, there's no such thing is "cache" consistency. What you are referring to is probably memory consistency. Cache coherency is relevant in a multicore system where each processor has a private L1 cache and at least one other level is shared. Memory consistency is relevant whether there are caches or not.

source: quora.com
Causal Consistency
Causal Consistency

Causal consistency is known as one of the main weak memory consistency models that can be used to assign consistency restrictions to all memory accesses for distributed implementations of data structures in the domain of concurrent programming. For example, in distributed shared memory and distributed transactions.

PRAM Consistency (aka FIFO Consistency)
PRAM Consistency (aka FIFO Consistency)

PRAM Consistency (aka FIFO consistency) PRAM consistency (Pipelined RAM) was presented by Lipton and Sandberg in 1988 as one of the first described consistency models.

Processor Consistency
Processor Consistency

A system exhibits Processor Consistency if the order in which other processors see the writes from any individual processor is the same as the order they were issued. Because of this, Processor Consistency is only applicable to systems with multiple processors.

Release Consistency
Release Consistency

Release consistency vs. sequential consistency Hardware structure and program-level effort. Sequential consistency can be achieved simply by hardware implementation, while release consistency is also based on an observation that most of the parallel programs are properly synchronized.

Sequential Consistency
Sequential Consistency

Sequential consistency is one of the consistency models used in the domain of concurrent computing (e.g. in distributed shared memory, distributed transactions, etc.).. It was first defined as the property that requires that

Slow Consistency
Slow Consistency

The speed of a consistency check depends on the speed of the disk I/O subsystem, how many differences are encountered, and your network speed (don't forget to take into account throttling that may be enabled).

image: kvibe.com
Strict Consistency
Strict Consistency

Strict Consistency. Strict consistency is the strongest consistency model. Under this model, a write to a variable by any processor needs to be seen ...