A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Cooking

Boiling
Boiling

After separation, the wort is transferred to a vessel called the kettle or copper for boiling, which is necessary to arrest enzyme activity and to obtain the bitterness value of added hops. Boiling is used primarily to cook meats and vegetables.

Boiling Veggies
Boiling Veggies

Once your veggies are chopped and the water is boiling, it's time to boil the vegetables. Boiling The Vegetables. Now that your vegetables are cut into chunks, and you have some boiling, salted water, we can talk about boiling vegetables. Here what you need to do: Add the vegetables to the boiling water.

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Braising and Stewing Veggies
Braising and Stewing Veggies

And while braising is similar to stewing, the two cooking methods do have some slight differences. BOTH are moist heat, slow cooking methods that tenderize the beef and develop rich beef flavor BOTH start with less-tender beef cuts as this cooking method softens the strong muscle fibers and connective tissue, guaranteeing tender, moist, flavorful results.

source: thekitchn.com
Broiling
Broiling

Broiling, cooking by exposing food to direct radiant heat, either on a grill over live coals or below a gas burner or electric coil. Broiling differs from roasting and baking in that the food is turned during the process so as to cook one side at a time.

Frying Veggies
Frying Veggies

If you've got a compelling argument for cooking them any other way, I'd like to hear it. If you've got a compelling argument for cooking them any other way, I'd like to hear it.

source: buzzfeed.com
Grilling
Grilling

Grilling is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above or below. Grilling usually involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat and vegetables quickly.

No Cooking!
No Cooking!

Refreshingly easy, no-cook recipes for when it’s too hot to turn on the oven.

Poaching
Poaching

Poaching is a culinary technique that involves cooking something in liquid with a temperature ranging from 140°F to 180°F. This compares with boiling, which happens at 212°F, and simmering, in which food is immersed in a cooking liquid with a temperature in the range between 180° and 205°F.

Raw Veggies
Raw Veggies

There's no easy answer, since cooking powers up the nutrients in some vegetables—and does the exact opposite in others. "Some produce is most nutritious uncooked, while other kinds need heat to bring out the best in them," says Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD, a registered dietitian with a practice in Chicago.

source: health.com
Roasting and Baking Veggies
Roasting and Baking Veggies

Roasting involves cooking foods that already have a solid structure before the cooking process begins (think: meat and vegetables). Baking involves that foods that lack structure early on, then become solid and lose their "empty space" during the cooking (think: cakes and muffins).

source: thekitchn.com
Sautéing
Sautéing

Sautéing (UK: / ˈ s oʊ t eɪ. ɪ ŋ /, US: / s oʊ ˈ t eɪ. ɪ ŋ, s ɔː-/; from French sauté, meaning 'jumped, bounced' in reference to tossing while cooking) is a method of cooking food that uses a small amount of oil or fat in a shallow pan over relatively high heat.

Sautéing Veggies
Sautéing Veggies

Sautéing, defined. To sauté is to cook food quickly in a minimal amount of fat over relatively high heat. The word comes from the French verb sauter, which means "to jump," and describes not only how food reacts when placed in a hot pan but also the method of tossing the food in the pan.

Schwenker
Schwenker

Traditional schwenker (or schwenkbraten) uses juicy pork steaks that have been cut from the neck. Since pork neck can be a bit tricky to find, we used 1 inch thick pork chops for our schwenker. One thing that we must admit is that we didn’t actually construct a schwenker to cook our schwenkbraten.

Searing
Searing

Food is most often seared in a small quantity of oil and is then cooked to the appropriate doneness using another cooking method such as roasting, grilling, or braising. Searing can be done in a frying pan, broiler, oven, or on a grill. Meat is a food that is often seared to provide a flavorful brown crust on the surface.

Seasoning
Seasoning

Simple pantry spices combine to make a savory, flavorful adobo seasoning to sprinkle on chicken, fish, meat, cottage cheese, or anything you'd like to zing up. It's so easy to make it yourself.

image: ebay.com
Separating Eggs
Separating Eggs

As you do this, some of the egg white will flow into the center bowl underneath, but the yolk and the rest of the egg white will remain in the lower half of the shell. Pour the remaining egg back and forth from one half-shell to the other, letting some more of the white flow into the bowl each time until only the yolk remains in the shell.

image: storify.com
Shallow Frying
Shallow Frying

Shallow frying is an oil-based cooking technique. It is typically used to prepare portion-sized cuts of meat and fish, and patties such as fritters. Shallow frying can also be used to cook vegetables.

Shirred Eggs
Shirred Eggs

Shirred eggs are most often prepared as a broiled egg dish, although occasionally the eggs are baked. Eggs are placed in small buttered dishes referred to as ramekins and broiled until the white is set, but the yolk remains liquid.

Shrivelling
Shrivelling

Shrivelling is a natural phenomenon where an object, with an attached sub-elastic covering, has its interior volume reduced in some way. The covering, which cannot contract any further, is then obliged to wrinkle and buckle, in order to preserve surface area while containing the lesser volume.

Steaming
Steaming

Steaming is a very gentle cooking method, making it ideal for delicate items like seafood. Steam also cooks the food quickly while retaining its nutrients. Steaming is a very gentle cooking method, making it ideal for delicate items like seafood.

Steaming Veggies
Steaming Veggies

You can mix vegetables, but be aware that more tender vegetables, like broccoli, will cook faster than denser vegetables, like carrots. If you want to steam mixed vegetables at the same time, add the longer-cooking …

source: thekitchn.com
Stir-Frying
Stir-Frying

Stir-frying was first developed in China as a cooking method that worked efficiently on simple brick stoves. The typical stovetop had a hole over the fire chamber. A round-bottomed wok fit over the lipped hole, capturing the heat efficiently.

Stir-Frying Veggies
Stir-Frying Veggies

Good vegetables for stir-frying include sweet peppers, zucchini, carrots, broccoli, yellow or white onions, green onions, pea pods, cabbage, spinach, asparagus, mushrooms, and leafy Asian greens in the "choy" family, such as bok choy and yu choy.

source: bhg.com
The Methods Microwaving
The Methods Microwaving

A microwave oven (also commonly referred to as a microwave) is an electric oven that heats and cooks food by exposing it to electromagnetic radiation in the microwave frequency range. This induces polar molecules in the food to rotate and produce thermal energy in a process known as dielectric heating.

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