A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Core

Arrandale​
Arrandale​

Arrandale is the successor of the 45 nm Core-microarchitecture-based Penryn processor that is used in many of the mobile Intel Core 2, Celeron and Pentium Dual-Core processors.

Cannon Lake​
Cannon Lake​

Cannon Lake (formerly Skymont) is Intel's codename for the 10-nanometer die shrink of the Kaby Lake microarchitecture.As a die shrink, Cannon Lake is a new process in Intel's "Process-Architecture-Optimization" execution plan as the next step in semiconductor fabrication.

image: wccftech.com
Celeron​
Celeron​

The Celeron M 400-series is a 65 nm Celeron M based on the single-core Yonah chip, like the Core Solo. Like its predecessors in the Celeron M series, this Celeron M has half of the L2 cache (1 MB) of Core Solo and lacks SpeedStep. This core also brings new features to Celeron M including a higher front side bus (533 MT/s), SSE3 instructions.

Clarkdale​
Clarkdale​

Products formerly Clarkdale product listing with links to detailed product features and specifications.

source: ark.intel.com
Coffee Lake​
Coffee Lake​

Coffee Lake is Intel's codename for the second 14 nm process refinement following Broadwell, Skylake, and Kaby Lake. The integrated graphics on Coffee Lake chips allow support for DP 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 and HDCP 2.2 connectivity.

Gulftown​
Gulftown​

Gulftown or Westmere-EP is the codename of an up to six-core hyperthreaded Intel processor able to run up to 12 threads in parallel. It is based on Westmere microarchitecture, the 32 nm shrink of Nehalem. Originally rumored to be called the Intel Core i9, it is sold as an Intel Core i7.

image: thgtr.com
Intel 4004​
Intel 4004​

The Intel 4004 is a 4-bit central processing unit (CPU) released by Intel Corporation in 1971. It was the first commercially available microprocessor by Intel. The 4004 was the first in a long line of Intel CPUs.

image: pcworld.com
Intel 8080​
Intel 8080​

The Intel 8080 ("eighty-eighty") was the second 8-bit microprocessor designed and manufactured by Intel and was released in April 1974. It is an extended and enhanced variant of the earlier 8008 design, although without binary compatibility.

Intel Atom​
Intel Atom​

Intel Atom® processors work beautifully with the latest audio and video technology, including 3D capture and 1080 HD graphics and voice. With better noise filters included, Intel Atom® processors make every call or video clearer than ever before.

source: intel.com
Intel Core​
Intel Core​

Intel Core i3, Core i5, and Core i7 CPUs have been around for a few years now, but some buyers still get stumped whenever they attempt to build their own systems and are forced to choose among the three. With the more recent Haswell (fourth generation ) architecture now on store shelves, we expect the latest wave of buyers to ask the same kind of questions.

image: pcworld.com
Intel Core 2​
Intel Core 2​

Core 2 is a brand encompassing a range of Intel's consumer 64-bit x86-64 single-, dual-, and quad-core microprocessors based on the Core microarchitecture. The single- and dual-core models are single-die, whereas the quad-core models comprise two dies, each containing two cores, packaged in a multi-chip module.

Intel Core 2 ​Duo​
Intel Core 2 ​Duo​

Core 2 is a brand encompassing a range of Intel's consumer 64-bit x86-64 single-, dual-, and quad-core microprocessors based on the Core microarchitecture. The single- and dual-core models are single-die, whereas the quad-core models comprise two dies, each containing two cores, packaged in a multi-chip module.

image: ebay.com
Intel Core 2 ​Quad​
Intel Core 2 ​Quad​

Intel® Core™2 Quad Processor Q6600 (8M Cache, 2.40 GHz, 1066 MHz FSB) quick reference guide including specifications, features, pricing, compatibility, design documentation, ordering codes, spec codes and more.

source: ark.intel.com
image: ebay.co.uk
Intel Core i3​
Intel Core i3​

Core i3, Core i5, Core i7 — the difference in a nutshell If you want a plain and simple answer, then generally speaking, Core i7s are better than Core i5s, which are in turn better than Core i3s. Nope, Core i7 does not have seven cores nor does Core i3 have three cores.

Intel Core i7​
Intel Core i7​

Discounting Core i3 and m3 (mainly found in budget systems), Core i9 (powerful CPUs for gaming and performance PCs), and AMD processors (another story entirely), the difference between Intel Core i5 and Core i7 can seem daunting, especially when the prices seem so close together once they're in completed systems.

source: pcmag.com
Intel DX4​
Intel DX4​

The IntelDX4 is a clock-tripled i486 microprocessor with 16 KB L1 cache. Intel named it DX4 (rather than DX3) as a consequence of litigation with AMD over trademarks.The product was officially named the IntelDX4, but OEMs continued using the i486 naming convention.

Itanium​
Itanium​

The peak number of Itanium-based machines on the list occurred in the November 2004 list, at 84 systems (16.8%); by June 2012, this had dropped to one system (0.2%), and no Itanium system remained on the list in November 2012. Processors Released processors. The Itanium processors show a progression in capability.

image: ixbtlabs.com
Lynnfield​
Lynnfield​

Lynnfield is the code name for a quad-core processor from Intel released in September 2009. It was sold in varying configurations as Core i5-7xx, Core i7-8xx or Xeon X34xx. Lynnfield uses the Nehalem microarchitecture and replaces the earlier Penryn based Yorkfield processor, using the same 45 nm process technology, but a new memory and bus interface.

Pentium 4​
Pentium 4​

Pentium 4 is a brand by Intel for an entire series of single-core CPUs for desktops, laptops and entry-level servers. The processors were shipped from November 20, 2000, until August 8, 2008. All Pentium 4 CPUs are based on the NetBurst architecture. The Pentium 4 Willamette (180 nm) introduced SSE2, while the Prescott (90 nm) introduced SSE3.

Pentium D​
Pentium D​

The Pentium D brand refers to two series of desktop dual-core 64-bit x86-64 microprocessors with the NetBurst microarchitecture, which is the dual-core variant of Pentium 4 "Prescott" manufactured by Intel.

image: tekgems.com
Pentium II​
Pentium II​

The Deschutes core Pentium II (80523), which debuted at 333 MHz in January 1998, was produced with a 0.25 µm process and has a significantly lower power draw. The die size is 113 mm 2. The 333 MHz variant was the final Pentium CPU that used the older 66 MHz front side bus; all subsequent Deschutes-core models used a 100 MHz FSB.

image: ebay.co.uk
Pentium III​
Pentium III​

The first Pentium III variant was the Katmai (Intel product code 80525). It was a further development of the Deschutes Pentium II. The Pentium III saw an increase of 2 million transistors over the Pentium II.

Pentium M​
Pentium M​

The first Pentium M–branded CPU, code-named Banias, was followed by Dothan. The Pentium M-branded processors were succeeded by the Core-branded dual-core mobile Yonah CPU with a modified microarchitecture.

image: newegg.com
Pentium Pro​
Pentium Pro​

The Pentium Pro is a sixth-generation x86 microprocessor developed and manufactured by Intel introduced in November 1, 1995. It introduced the P6 microarchitecture (sometimes referred to as i686) and was originally intended to replace the original Pentium in a full range of applications.

Sandy Bridge​
Sandy Bridge​

Sandy Bridge is the codename for the microarchitecture used in the "second generation" of the Intel Core processors (Core i7, i5, i3) - the Sandy Bridge microarchitecture is the successor to Nehalem microarchitecture.

Sempron​
Sempron​

AMD Sempron™CPU Overview . The AMD Sempron™ CPU performs at the top of its class when running the home and business applications most.

source: amd.com
image: newegg.com
Silvermont​
Silvermont​

Silvermont is a microarchitecture for low-power Atom, Celeron and Pentium branded processors used in systems on a chip (SoCs) made by Intel. Silvermont forms the basis for a total of four SoC families:

Skylake​
Skylake​

Intel's sixth-generation Core microarchitecture, also known by its development code name "Skylake," made its official debut at Gamescom in August, with the release of its high-end Core i7-6700K and Core i7-6600K desktop chips.

source: pcmag.com
image: vr-zone.com
Xeon​
Xeon​

Only Xeon processors support ECC RAM. More cores, multi CPU options – If your applications require as many CPU cores as possible, Xeon is what you need. The new Xeon v4 processors max out at 18 cores (36 after Hyperthreading) whereas even the new Broadwell-E i7-6950X has just ten.