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Types of Criminals

Aggravated Assault
Aggravated Assault

The crimes of assault, assault and battery, and aggravated assault all involve intentional harm inflicted on one person by another. Any crime involving a physical attack (or even the threat of an attack) is usually classified as an assault, a battery, or both.

source: nolo.com
Arson
Arson

Arson is defined as the intentional burning of a structure, building, land or property.

source: thoughtco.com
image: factfile.org
Assault
Assault

It is both a crime and a tort and, therefore, may result in either criminal or civil liability. Generally, the common law definition is the same in criminal and Tort Law. There is, however, an additional Criminal Law category of assault consisting of an attempted but unsuccessful Battery.

Battery
Battery

Find out what the crime of battery is, the different types of battery charges with examples, and common defense strategies used in battery cases. Find out what the crime of battery is, the different types of battery charges with examples, and common defense strategies used in battery cases.

source: thoughtco.com
image: youtube.com
Blackmail
Blackmail

Blackmail is a crime in which the offender threatens to reveal information about a victim or his family members that is potentially embarrassing, socially damaging, or incriminating unless a demand for money, property or services is met.

image: mirror.co.uk
Bribery
Bribery

Bribery: An Overview Bribes are always intended to influence or alter the action of various individuals and go hand in hand with both political and public corruption. No written agreement is necessary to prove the crime of bribery, but a prosecutor generally must show corrupt intent.

Burglary
Burglary

Burglary is typically defined as the unlawful entry into almost any structure (not just a home or business) with the intent to commit any crime inside (not just theft/larceny). No physical breaking and entering is required; the offender may simply trespass through an open door.

image: fox2now.com
Embezzlement
Embezzlement

(ii) Criminal conversion: Embezzlement is a crime against ownership, that is, voiding the right of the owner to control the disposition and use of the property entrusted to the embezzler.

Extortion
Extortion

What is extortion? by FreeAdvice staff Extortion is a crime in which one person forces another person to do something against his will, generally to give up money or other property, by threat of violence, property damage, damage to the person’s reputation, or extreme financial hardship.

False Imprisonment
False Imprisonment

False imprisonment can be both a crime and a civil cause of action (also known as a tort). Falling under the category of intentional torts, false imprisonment involves intentionally restricting another person's freedom of movement.

source: nolo.com
False Pretenses
False Pretenses

Forgery can be likened to false pretenses in that it is a crime where the genuineness of a document is falsely represented. In addition to being criminally accountable for obtaining property by false pretenses, the wrongdoer may also be liable in a civil court.

Fraud
Fraud

Fraud is a crime that many people equate with theft, but there is a distinction. There is also a distinction between criminal fraud and civil fraud.

Homicide
Homicide

A homicide may be justifiable or excusable by the surrounding circumstances. In such cases, the homicide will not be considered a criminal act. A justifiable homicide is a homicide that is commanded or authorized by law. For instance, soldiers in a time of war may be commanded to kill enemy soldiers.

image: wisegeek.org
Kidnapping
Kidnapping

Kidnapping is also a federal crime and a kidnapper can face both state and federal charges. First-degree kidnapping almost always involves physical harm to the victim, the threat of physical harm, or when the victim is a child.

source: thoughtco.com
Larceny / Theft
Larceny / Theft

Larceny is what most people think of as common theft - the taking of someone else's property without the use of force. The Model Penal Code and the laws of several states place larceny and certain other property crimes under the general category of theft.

Motor Vehicle Theft
Motor Vehicle Theft

Motor Vehicle theft or grand theft auto is the criminal act of stealing or attempting to steal a motor vehicle. Nationwide in the United States in 2012, there were an estimated 721,053 motor vehicle thefts, or approximately 229.7 motor vehicles stolen for every 100,000 inhabitants.

Robbery
Robbery

Robbery is the criminal activity of illegally, unlawfully, and illicitly possessing property belonging to another individual typically through violent or threatening means.

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