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Types of Daisies List

African ​Daisies​
African ​Daisies​

Daisies can be propagated by division in spring or through sowing seeds in spring or late autumn. English Daisy is a serious weed in the northwest United States. The Daisy flowers open at dawn and are visited by many small insects. Daisies are used by children to make daisy chains. The Daisy's leaves are edible and can be used in salads.

Ageratum​
Ageratum​

Not to mention, ageratum are some of the truest blue annuals you can find! Characterized by their powder-puff blooms, these plants begin to bloom in late spring and keep the show going until the first frost. These are some rugged plants that can withstand tough soil conditions and even deer! However, take caution when planning your garden, as all parts of this plant are poisonous if ingested, so site ageratum carefully.

source: bhg.com
Artichoke​
Artichoke​

Artichokes can be served as an appetizer or a side dish, stuffed artichokes serve as a delicious addition to a meal, and artichoke hearts can be added to salads and pastas. The most complementary seasonings for an artichoke are olive oil, lemon, parsley, salt and pepper.

source: draxe.com
Asteroideae​
Asteroideae​

Subfamily: Asteroideae The Asteroideae subfamily contains over 70% of the species in the entire Asteraceae family. It contains over 21 tribes, including: Astereae, Anthemideae, Calenduleae, Heliantheae, and Perityleae, which include most types of daisies.

source: ftd.com
Black-Eyed ​Susan​
Black-Eyed ​Susan​

Rudbeckia hirta is one of a number of plants with the common name black-eyed Susan. Other common names for this plant include: brown-eyed Susan, brown betty, gloriosa daisy, golden Jerusalem, English bull's eye, poor-land daisy, yellow daisy, and yellow ox-eye daisy. Rudbeckia hirta is the state flower of Maryland.

Blanket ​Flowers​
Blanket ​Flowers​

Find essential growing information on the blanket flower, including: colors, height and width, hardiness zones, seasonal features, light, and special features. Check out more information about blanket flower seeds and explore tips for planting blanket flower plant.

source: bhg.com
image: pinterest.ca
Chicory​
Chicory​

Chicory root extract is a dietary supplement or food additive produced by mixing dried, ground chicory root with water, and removing the insoluble fraction by filtration and centrifugation. Other methods may be used to remove pigments and sugars. It is used as a source of

image: cbsally.com
Chrysanthemum​
Chrysanthemum​

Chrysanthemum blooms are divided into 10 different bloom forms by the US National Chrysanthemum Society, Inc., which is in keeping with the international classification system. The bloom forms are defined by the way in which the ray and disk florets are arranged.

image: ebay.com
Cirsium​
Cirsium​

The Plant List includes a further 515 scientific plant names of infraspecific rank for the genus Cirsium. We do not intend The Plant List to be complete for names of infraspecific rank. These are primarily included because names of species rank are synonyms of accepted infraspecific names.

Coltsfoot​
Coltsfoot​

Not enough is known about the safety of using hepatotoxic PA-free coltsfoot during breast-feeding. Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Coltsfoot may cause an allergic reaction in people who are allergic to the Asteraceae/Compositae plant family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others.

source: rxlist.com
Common ​Daisy​
Common ​Daisy​

Shasta daisies are a cultivated hybrid member of a large family of European wildflowers (Leucanthemum) with yellow centers and white petals, that tend to look like the typical coloring-book daisy. Many Leucanthemum-type daisies are invasive when planted in the US and will take over an area if allowed to.

source: dengarden.com
Common ​Sunflower​
Common ​Sunflower​

Daisies belonging to this genus are not to be confused with the Dimorphotheca – which look highly similar but are annuals instead of perennials. Tribe: Heliantheae There are 2,500 species within this tribe, with the most recognizable being the sunflower. Other common plants include echinacea, stevia and zinnias.

source: ftd.com
Common ​Wormwood​
Common ​Wormwood​

Daisies are part of the Asteraceae family, as are other ornamental plants like marigolds and chrysanthemums, and edible plants like lettuces, sunflowers, chicory, safflower, and artichokes. Also belonging to the daisy family are herbs like arnica, wormwood, tarragon, and camomile.

source: dengarden.com
Coneflower​
Coneflower​

Some species of Echinacea, notably E. purpurea, E. angustifolia, and E. pallida, are grown as ornamental plants in gardens. Many cultivars exist, and many of them are asexually propagated to keep them true to type. Echinacea extracts inhibited growth of three species of trypanosomatids: Leishmania donovani, Leishmania major, and Trypanosoma brucei.

Coneflowers​
Coneflowers​

The purple coneflower is a type of daisy that can grow nearly four feet tall. The name is given to Echinacea purpurea and other Echinacea species. Echinaceas, including the purple coneflower, are used in cold remedies to stimulate the immune system.

source: dengarden.com
image: ebay.com
Dahlia​
Dahlia​

Dahlia is a genus of the uplands and mountains, being found at elevations between 1,500 and 3,700 meters, in what has been described as a "pine-oak woodland" vegetative zone. Most species have limited ranges scattered throughout many mountain ranges in Mexico . Ecology. The commonest pollinators are bees and small beetles.

Dandelion​
Dandelion​

Daisy and dandelion are types of herbaceous plants that belong to the aster family. Daisy is native to Europe, while dandelion originates from Eurasia and North America. Both plants can be found in temperate areas around the world today.

Elecampane​
Elecampane​

Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Elecampane may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae plant family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others.

English ​Marigold​
English ​Marigold​

These daisy types come in a wide assortment of colors and shapes, and are a far stretch from the classic white daisy that we all know. Popular Types of Daisies. English Daisy; With its classic yellow center and long white petals, the English daisy is also referred to as the common daisy.

source: ftd.com
Everlasting ​Flowers​
Everlasting ​Flowers​

The everlasting flower is a member of the compositae family, which is most commonly linked with the asteraceae family of flowers. Some of the most frequently seen everlasting flowers are the daisy and sunflower, the strawflower and the gobe amaranthus.

Fleabane​
Fleabane​

Daisy fleabane, like other fleabane wildflowers, derives its common name from the superstition that dried clusters of these plants could be used to rid a dwelling of fleas. Although it cannot do that, it is however used as a diuretic and medicine for digestive ailments.

German ​Chamomile​
German ​Chamomile​

is that daisy is a wild flowering plant (taxlink) of the asteraceae family, with a yellow head and white petals while camomile is a composite plant, (taxlink), which resembles the daisy and possesses a bitter, aromatic quality, used in the making of teas and as a herbal remedy.

source: wikidiff.com
Goldenrod​
Goldenrod​

People who are allergic to ragweed are very likely to also be allergic to daisies or any products made from daisies. The Daisy Flowers Message Is… The daisy’s message is, ultimately, one of hope and renewal. In sending daisies, the sender hopes the viewer will see the world as they once did as a child. Just be sure not to send daisies to anyone with ragweed allergies.

image: ebay.com
Hawkweed​
Hawkweed​

Hieracium or hawkweeds, like others in the Asteraceae family, have mostly yellow, tightly packed flower-heads of numerous small flowers but, unlike daisies and sunflowers in the same family, they have not two kinds of florets but only strap-shaped florets, each one of which is a complete flower in itself, not lacking stamens, and joined to the stem by leafy bracts.

Jerusalem ​Artichoke​
Jerusalem ​Artichoke​

The Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus), also called sunroot, sunchoke, earth apple, or topinambour, is a species of sunflower native to eastern North America, and found from eastern Canada and Maine west to North Dakota, and south to northern Florida and Texas.

image: pxhere.com
Lactuca​
Lactuca​

Lactuca sativa is a member of the Lactuca (lettuce) genus and the Asteraceae (sunflower or aster) family. The species was first described in 1753 by Carl Linnaeus in the second volume of his Species Plantarum. Synonyms for L. sativa include Lactuca scariola var. sativa, L. scariola var. integrata and L. scariola var. integrifolia.

Lettuce​
Lettuce​

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is an annual plant of the daisy family, Asteraceae. It is most often grown as a leaf vegetable, but sometimes for its stem and seeds. Lettuce is most often used for salads, although it is also seen in other kinds of food, such as soups, sandwiches and wraps; it can also be grilled.

Leucanthemum​
Leucanthemum​

Leucanthemum is a genus of flowering plants in the aster family, Asteraceae. It is mainly distributed in southern and central Europe. Some species are known on other continents as introduced species, and some are cultivated as ornamental plants.

Marigold​
Marigold​

We’ve created a compendium with 94 types of daisies, ... Types of Daisies: A Visual Compendium. Share. ... includes marigolds, there are several daisy types within ...

source: ftd.com
Marigolds​
Marigolds​

Information on Daisies including colours, types, facts, varieties, pictures, meaning, biology, growing care, tips

Mayweed​
Mayweed​

The “crazy” or chamomile daisy has frilly leaves along its sturdy, tall stems. High country dwellers, look around. This daisy is all over town. The more widespread of the two noxious daisies in Summit and Park counties is the chamomile daisy, also known as mayweed or scentless daisy (Tripleurospermum inodorum syn. Matricaria inodora, M. perforata).

Milk Thistle​
Milk Thistle​

Milk thistle (silymarin) is a flowering herb related to the daisy and ragweed family. It is native to Mediterranean countries. Some people also call it Mary thistle and holy thistle.

source: webmd.com
image: nwcb.wa.gov
Mountain ​Arnica​
Mountain ​Arnica​

Arnica montana, also known as wolf's bane, leopard's bane, mountain tobacco and mountain arnica, is a moderately toxic ethnobotanical European flowering plant in the sunflower family. It is noted for its large yellow flower head. The names "wolf's bane" and "leopard's bane" are also used for another plant, aconitum, which is extremely poisonous. Arnica montana is used as an herbal medicine for analgesic and anti-inflammatory purposes. Clinical trials have produced mixed results.

Mugworts​
Mugworts​

Mugwort is a common name for several species of aromatic plants in the genus Artemisia. In Europe, mugwort most often refers to the species Artemisia vulgaris, or common mugwort. While other species are sometimes referred to by more specific common names, they may be called simply "mugwort" in many contexts.

Ragweed​
Ragweed​

When botanists refer to daisies, they mean an entire group of plant species in the plant family called Asteraceae, which also includes aster flowers, ragweed and sunflowers. Daisies can be found in many parts of the world, including North America, Europe and Africa.

Ragworts​
Ragworts​

Senecio / s ɪ ˈ n iː ʃ i. oʊ / is a genus of the daisy family that includes ragworts and groundsels. The scientific Latin genus name, Senecio, means "old man." Variously circumscribed taxonomically, the genus Senecio is one of the largest genera of flowering plants.

Safflower​
Safflower​

When safflower has been used as placebo in some clinical trials, it showed no effect on blood pressure, heart rate, or brachial artery vascular conductance. 11, 17. Safflower oil consumption has been reported to have variable and/or inconsistent effects on plasma lipids.

source: drugs.com
Sow Thistles​
Sow Thistles​

They are respectfully the common sow thistle, the spiny sow thistle and the field sow thistle. The Oleraceus has green leaves with a bit of blue, Delta- arrow-shaped end lobes and distinctly pointed lobes where it clasps the stem. The asper has spiny round lobes where it clasps the stem. It also has a lot of spines.

Spanish ​Needles​
Spanish ​Needles​

Spanish Needle ( Tharwad ) is fruitful in reducing Abscess. An infusion prepared from boiled Spanish Needle ( Tharwad ) leaves can heal Cuts. It supplies the Blood to the Heart Muscles. Thus, it is a beneficial remedy to stop causing Angina.

source: herbpathy.com
image: flickr.com
Sunflowers​
Sunflowers​

Lined 60-sheet poppies, sunflowers, and daisies pads are 3-1/2" x 6-1/2".

Tanacetum​
Tanacetum​

Some members of the genus Chrysanthemum, such as the following two, are placed in the genus Tanacetum instead by some botanists. Both genera are members of the daisy (or aster) family, Asteraceae. They are all perennial plants with a daisy-like appearance and white petals.

Tansy​
Tansy​

In England tansy is placed on window sills to repel flies; sprigs are placed in bed linen to drive away pests, and it has been used as an ant repellent. In the 1940s, distilled tansy oil mixed with fleabane, pennyroyal and diluted alcohol was a well-known mosquito repellent; collectors were paid five cents a pound for tansy in full bloom.

image: flickr.com
Tickseed​
Tickseed​

Coreopsis lanceolata is hardy in Zones 3-8 and bears bright yellow daisies in May and June on plants to 2 feet tall. 'Limerock Dream' coreopsis Coreopsis 'Limerock Dream' is usually grown as an annual, even though it is hardy in Zones 6-9.

source: bhg.com
Transvaal ​Daisy​
Transvaal ​Daisy​

Gerbera is native to tropical regions of South America, Africa and Asia. The first scientific description of a Gerbera was made by J.D. Hooker in Curtis's Botanical Magazine in 1889 when he described Gerbera jamesonii, a South African species also known as Transvaal daisy or Barberton daisy. Gerbera is also commonly known as the African daisy.

image: flickr.com
Yarrows​
Yarrows​

Yarrow is native to Europe and Asia, and has been naturalized in North America. Its use in food and medicine is ancient, dating back to the Trojan War, around 1200 BC. In legend, Achilles used it on the Centaur's advice, hence the name.

source: drugs.com
Zinnia​
Zinnia​

Zinnia liebmannii – Philactis zinnioides Zinnia elegans, also known as Zinnia violacea, is the most familiar species, originally from the warm regions of Mexico being a warm–hot climate plant. Its leaves are lance-shaped and sandpapery in texture, and height ranges from 15 cm to 1 meter.