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Types of Depression Test

/ 10 Major Depression
/ 10 Major Depression

Major depression, also known as unipolar or major depressive disorder, is characterized by a persistent feeling of sadness or a lack of interest in outside stimuli. The unipolar connotes a difference between major depression and bipolar depression, which refers to an oscillating state between depression and mania.

source: psycom.net
Atypical Depression
Atypical Depression

The name is a misnomer, though. It is not uncommon or unusual 2; in fact, atypical depression is over two times more common in women than men and is more chronic with an average earlier onset than melancholic depression 1. An increased risk of suicide and anxiety disorders is present with atypical depression.

source: psycom.net
Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder symptoms include switching between phases with feelings of mania and feelings of depression over time and can readily be treated with medications and psychotherapy. Instructions: The items below refer to how you have felt and behaved over much of your life.

Dysthymia
Dysthymia

Dysthymic disorder, or dysthymia, is a type of chronic depression that lasts for at least 2 years. Find out more about symptoms, causes, and treatments. Dysthymic disorder, or dysthymia, is a type of chronic depression that lasts for at least 2 years.

Major Depression
Major Depression

3 Minute Depression Test This depression quiz is based on the Depression Screening Test by Ivan Goldberg, M.D. According to the NIMH Major depression is one of the most common mental disorders affecting more than 15 million adults in the United States (~6.7% of the population).

source: psycom.net
Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) SanderStock/Getty Images
Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) SanderStock/Getty Images

Getty; Comstock Images;i Stock/Getty Images Plus; Thinkstock; AudioJungle; Rike; Vanessa Clara Ann Vokey; Somos/Veer; KatarzynaBialasiewicz; funduck [music playing] With major depression, it may be difficult to work, study, sleep, eat, and enjoy friends and activities.

source: webmd.com
Peripartum (Postpartum) Depression
Peripartum (Postpartum) Depression

But for women with postpartum, or peripartum, depression it can become very distressing and difficult. Postpartum depression is a serious, but treatable medical illness involving feelings of extreme sadness, indifference and/or anxiety, as well as changes in energy, sleep, and appetite.

Persistent Depressive Disorder
Persistent Depressive Disorder

As with any chronic illness, early diagnosis and medical treatment may reduce the intensity and duration of symptoms and also reduce the likelih ood of developing an episode of major depression. To treat dysthymia, doctors may use psychotherap y (talk therapy), medications such as antidepressants, or a combination of these therapies.

source: webmd.com
Persistent Depressive Disorder JGI/Jamie Grill/Getty Images
Persistent Depressive Disorder JGI/Jamie Grill/Getty Images

JGI/Jamie Grill/Getty Images Dysthymia, now known as persistent depressive disorder, refers to a type of chronic depression present for more days than not for at least two years. It can be mild, moderate, or severe.

image: self.com
Postpartum Depression
Postpartum Depression

We used to only think of depression as happening postpartum and concentrated on postpartum depression (PPD) but research has showed us that many women experience these symptoms during pregnancy too. Mood disorders such as depression and anxiety that occur during pregnancy or within a year of delivery are now referred to as Perinatal Mood Disorders (PPMDs).

source: ppdil.org
Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD)
Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD)

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe, sometimes disabling extension of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Although regular PMS and PMDD both have physical and emotional symptoms, PMDD causes extreme mood shifts that can disrupt your work and damage your relationships.

Psychotic Depression
Psychotic Depression

Psychotic depression affects roughly one out of every four people admitted to the hospital for depression. How Is Psychotic Depression Different From Major or Clinical Nonpsychotic Depression? According to the National Institute of Mental Health, a person who is psychotic is out of touch with reality.

source: webmd.com
image: imgkid.com
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

In fact research by the charity SADA (the Seasonal Affective Disorder Association, sada.org.uk) suggests as many as four million experience symptoms such as inexplicable sadness, fatigue and irritability triggered by lack of sunlight.

source: mirror.co.uk
Situational' Depression
Situational' Depression

Situational depression, also called reactive depression and frequently diagnosed as adjustment disorder with depression, is depression that can be connected to a particular situation. It is a commonly diagnosed form of depression.