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Types of Drought

Agricultural Drought
Agricultural Drought

Drought Resources August 05, 2013 Agricultural drought refers to circumstances when soil moisture is insufficient and results in the lack of crop growth and production. It primarily concerns itself with short-term drought situations.

Ecological Drought
Ecological Drought

The group has developed a framework and definition of ecological drought that is flexible across landscapes and helps communities prepare for the rising risk of drought, and the potential for novel drought conditions, in the 21st century.

source: casc.usgs.gov
Hydrological Drought
Hydrological Drought

Hydrological drought refers to shortages of water resources, when for example; groundwater, reservoir, or stream levels are significantly reduced. This is considered the drinking water type of drought. Conditions for hydrologic drought are built over extended periods of time.

Land and Water Temperatures Cause Drought
Land and Water Temperatures Cause Drought

Land and water temperatures cause drought. As overall temperatures increase more water evaporates and severe weather conditions increase. Landscapes and crops need more water to survive and overall the demand for water increases.

source: quora.com
Meteorological Drought
Meteorological Drought

Drought is often grouped into four basic types: 1) meteorological or climatological, 2) agricultural, 3) hydrological, and 4) socioeconomic. Meteorological and climatological drought is defined in terms of the magnitude of a precipitation shortfall and the duration of this shortfall event.

source: ametsoc.org
image: ametsoc.org
Socioeconomic Drought
Socioeconomic Drought

Socioeconomic drought occurs when the demand for an economic goods exceeds supply as a result of a weather-related shortfall in water supply. The supply of many economic goods, such as water, forage, food grains, fish, and hydroelectric power, depends on weather.

source: answers.com
Soil Moisture Levels Also Contribute to Drought
Soil Moisture Levels Also Contribute to Drought

Generally, however, soil moisture is the water that is held in the spaces between soil particles. Surface soil moisture is the water that is in the upper 10 cm of soil, whereas root zone soil moisture is the water that is available to plants, which is generally considered to be in the upper 200 cm of soil.

source: drought.gov