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Types of Dyslexia

Auditory Discrimination Problem
Auditory Discrimination Problem

So is an auditory processing problem the root cause of dyslexia? Perhaps, but all we know for certain at this point is that dyslexia is a problem with the decoding of words and the manipulation of the fundamental sounds of language or phonemes.

Auditory Processing Disorder
Auditory Processing Disorder

Some of the signs of dyslexia and auditory processing disorder look similar. Each condition can make it hard for kids to develop skills like reading, writing and rhyming. Kids can have APD and dyslexia at the same time. This table explains the differences and similarities between them.

Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD)
Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD)

The Difference Between Dyslexia and Auditory Processing ... Some of the signs of dyslexia and auditory processing disorder ... Dyslexia Auditory Processing Disorder;

Conclusion:
Conclusion:

For instant dyslexia has a nice collection of strengths. There are many famous people with dyslexia, like Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Walt Disney, Winston Churchill, George Patton, Jackie Stewart, etc.

Difficulty Remembering Spelling Patterns
Difficulty Remembering Spelling Patterns

Difficulty with spelling. Finding it hard to visualise words, or remember the sequence of letters in a word. Difficulty with sentence construction and punctuation. Difficulty putting information on paper. Difficulty in spotting mistakes made in written work. Finding it easier to express thoughts in words than in writing.

source: dyslexia.ie
Double Deficit Dyslexia
Double Deficit Dyslexia

You will hear references to the “double deficit” in dyslexics. This is a theory that dyslexics both have a weak phonological awareness (of the sounds in words) and also a poor naming speed rate, when asked to recall words: http://www.apa.org/monitor/mar00/dyslexia.aspx.

source: dm-ed.com
Dysgraphia
Dysgraphia

Dyslexia and dysgraphia are both learning issues. Dyslexia primarily affects reading. Dysgraphia mainly affects writing. While they’re different issues, the two are easy to confuse. They share symptoms and often occur together. This simple table can help you tell them apart. An issue that involves ...

Dysnomia
Dysnomia

Dysnomia is often misdiagnosed as expressive language disorder. If your child is exhibiting any of these symptoms, take them to see a neurologist as soon as you can. What is Dyslexia? Dyslexia is a reading disorder in which a learner has difficulty recognizing letters and learning letter sounds, despite normal intelligence.

Dysphonetic Deficit
Dysphonetic Deficit

Double Deficit Dyslexia. Experts believe that issues with naming speed are separate from problems with phonemic awareness. But some kids have both. The “double deficit” refers to a mix of phonological dyslexia and rapid naming deficit. Kids with this double deficit have trouble isolating sounds.

Evidence for Dyslexia Subtypes:
Evidence for Dyslexia Subtypes:

Learn about phonological dyslexia, ... The American Academy of Pediatrics doesn’t endorse these approaches because there isn’t enough evidence to back them up.

Orthographic Deficit
Orthographic Deficit

I believe dyslexia can occur when a student fails to make the transition from the phonological stage to the orthographic stage. Their difficulty is understanding the language, not the inability to visually memorize words.

Phonological Dyslexia
Phonological Dyslexia

Phonological dyslexia is extreme difficulty reading that is a result of phonological impairment, meaning the ability to manipulate the basic sounds of language. The individual sounds of language become 'sticky', unable to be broken apart and manipulated easily. This type of dyslexia is synonymous with dyslexia itself.

image: nessy.com
Rapid Naming Deficit
Rapid Naming Deficit

If your child is being tested for reading, executive functioning issues or slow processing speed, you may hear the term rapid automatized naming (RAN). It refers to the ability to quickly name aloud a series of familiar items on a page. These include letters, numbers, colors or objects.

image: sacrft.com
Surface Dyslexia
Surface Dyslexia

Surface Dyslexics need to sound out words and assemble the parts. Definition. According to Nancy Mather and Barbara Wendling in their excellent 2012 book Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention, surface dyslexia is: "A type of dyslexia characterized by difficulty with whole word recognition and spelling, especially when the words have irregular spelling-sound correspondences."

Visual and Auditory Dyslexia:
Visual and Auditory Dyslexia:

Visual processing issues involve trouble with processing information the eyes see. So if a child with visual processing issues is reading, he may have trouble processing the words he sees on a page. That may be why some people confuse visual processing issues and dyslexia.

Visual Dyslexia
Visual Dyslexia

Dyslexia involves trouble with processing language. It causes difficulty with reading, writing and other skills. Visual processing issues involve trouble with processing information the eyes see. So if a child with visual processing issues is reading, he may have trouble processing the words he sees on a page.

image: dyop.info

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