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Types of Dystonia

Cervical Dystonia
Cervical Dystonia

Cervical dystonia, or torticollis, is the most common type. Cervical dystonia typically occurs in middle-aged individuals. It has, though, been reported in people of all ages. Cervical dystonia affects the neck muscles, causing the head to twist and turn or be pulled backward or forward. Cranial dystonia affects the head, face, and neck muscles.

source: webmd.com
Cervical Dystonia or Spasmodic Torticollis
Cervical Dystonia or Spasmodic Torticollis

Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is a painful condition in which your neck muscles contract involuntarily, causing your head to twist or turn to one side. Cervical dystonia can also cause your head to uncontrollably tilt forward or backward.

Dopa-Responsive Dystonia
Dopa-Responsive Dystonia

Dopa-responsive dystonia is a disorder that involves involuntary muscle contractions, tremors, and other uncontrolled movements (dystonia). The features of this condition range from mild to severe.

Generalized Dystonia
Generalized Dystonia

Generalized dystonia refers to dystonia that is not limited to a single part of the body but affects multiple muscle groups throughout the body. Generalized dystonia typically affects muscles in the torso and limbs, and sometimes the neck and face.

Hemifacial Spasm
Hemifacial Spasm

Eye dystonia (the medical term is Blepharospasm) is uncontrollable and often painful muscle contractions around the eye. Symptoms of eye dystonia may include excessive blinking and involuntary closure of the eyelids. Hemifacial spasm. Hemifacial spasm causes the muscles on one side of the face to contract.

image: xeomin.com
Laryngeal Dystonia
Laryngeal Dystonia

Spasmodic dysphonia/laryngeal dystonia, a focal dystonia, involves involuntary contractions of the vocal cords causing interruptions of speech and affecting the voice quality. One of the most characteristic features of spasmodic dysphonia is the patterned, repeated 'breaks' in speech.

Oromandibular Dystonia
Oromandibular Dystonia

Oromandibular dystonia (cranial dystonia) Oromandibular dystonia is a focal dystonia characterized by forceful contractions of the face, jaw, and/or tongue causing difficulty in opening and closing the mouth and often affecting chewing and speech.

image: drugline.org
Spasmodic Dysphonia
Spasmodic Dysphonia

Spasmodic dysphonia belongs to a family of neurological disorders called dystonias. A dystonia is a movement disorder that causes muscles to contract and spasm involuntarily. Dystonias can be generalized, affecting the entire body, or focal, affecting only a specific area of the body or group of muscles.

source: dysphonia.org
Writer's Cramp
Writer's Cramp

Hand Dystonia/Writer’s Cramp Quick Facts. Writer's cramp is a focal dystonia of the fingers, hand, and/or forearm. Symptoms usually appear when a person is trying to do a task that requires fine motor movements such as writing or playing a musical instrument.