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Types of Edema

Calcium Channel Blockers
Calcium Channel Blockers

Calcium channel blocker (CCB)-related edema is quite common in clinical practice and can effectively deter a clinician from continued prescription of these drugs. Its etiology relates to a decrease in arteriolar resistance that goes unmatched in the venous circulation.

source: medscape.com
Corticosteroids (Like Prednisone and Methylprednisolone)
Corticosteroids (Like Prednisone and Methylprednisolone)

Many medicines can cause edema, including: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (such as ibuprofen and naproxen) Calcium channel blockers; Corticosteroids (like prednisone and methylprednisolone)

source: webmd.com
Pioglitazone and Rosiglitazone
Pioglitazone and Rosiglitazone

Pioglitazone and rosiglitazone are glitazones and PPARg agonists that are FDAapproved and used widely to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as atopic dermatitis. Pioglitazone was successful in a 47 year-old male patient with active and symptomatic LPP who had failed all treatments.

Pramipexole
Pramipexole

Applies to pramipexole: oral tablet, oral tablet extended release General The most common adverse reactions occurring in early Parkinson's disease when used without levodopa were somnolence, insomnia, nausea, constipation, dizziness, fatigue, asthenia, hallucinations, dry mouth, muscle spasms, and peripheral edema.

source: drugs.com

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