A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of elm Trees

American elm​
American elm​

The American elm is a deciduous hermaphroditic tree which, before the introduction of Dutch elm disease, commonly grew to > 30 m (100 ft) tall with a trunk > 1.2 m (4 ft) d.b.h supporting a high, spreading umbrella-like canopy.

Cedar elm​
Cedar elm​

Cedar Elm Ulmus crassifolia The cedar elm serves dual purposes. It is a lovely tree that provide nice shade, but it is also very hardy in adverse conditions—tolerating both drought and wet soil.

source: arborday.org
Chinese elm​
Chinese elm​

Also known as the dynasty Chinese elm or dynasty lacebark elm, the Chinese elm is deciduous, generally turning an uninteresting yellow color before leaves drop in fall. Sometimes, however, the tree displays more interesting reds of purple fall leaves.

Siberian elm​
Siberian elm​

Fast Growing Siberian Elm Trees. Siberian Elm Trees, Ulmus pumila, is one of the fastest growing hedge trees available. Siberian Elms are hardy and drought resistant once established. This fast growing shade tree is also considered to be a great windbreak tree when planted in rows.

Slippery elm​
Slippery elm​

Slippery elm bark contains a substance that becomes slick and slippery when mixed with water, hence the name. The tree has been used in herbal medicine in this country for centuries. For more information about slippery elm herb uses, click this article.

Ulmus ​Canescens​
Ulmus ​Canescens​

Ulmus minor subsp. canescens (Melville) Browicz & Ziel. Ulmus canescens Melville is a small deciduous tree occasionally known by the common names grey elm, grey-leafed elm, and hoary elm.

Ulmus Glabra​
Ulmus Glabra​

Ulmus glabra, the wych elm, Scotch elm or Scots elm, has the widest range of the European elm species, from Ireland eastwards to the Urals, and from the Arctic Circle south to the mountains of the Peloponnese in Greece; it is also found in Iran.

Ulmus Laevis​
Ulmus Laevis​

Ulmus laevis is similar in stature to the wych elm, if rather less symmetric, with a looser branch structure and less neatly rounded crown. It typically reaches a height and breadth of > 30 m, with a trunk < 2 m d.b.h.

Ulmus Minor​
Ulmus Minor​

Interesting fact: before metal was widely available, many English towns had water mains supplied from pipes made from elm wood, including Bristol, Reading, Exeter, Southampton, Hull and Liverpool. This species was previously referred to as Ulmus minor var. vulgaris.

Ulmus Minor ​'Atinia'​
Ulmus Minor ​'Atinia'​

The Field Elm cultivar Ulmus minor 'Atinia', commonly known as the English Elm, formerly Common Elm and Horse May, and more lately the Atinian Elm was, before the spread of Dutch elm disease, the most common field elm in central southern England, though not native there, and one of the largest and fastest-growing deciduous trees in Europe.

Ulmus ​Serotina​
Ulmus ​Serotina​

Ulmus serotina Sarg., the September elm, is an American species uncommon beyond Tennessee; only very locally distributed through Illinois, Kentucky, Arkansas, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Alabama and Georgia, and disjunct into Nuevo León, Mexico. It grows predominantly on limestone bluffs and along streams to elevations of 400 m.

Ulmus ​Thomasii​
Ulmus ​Thomasii​

Ulmus thomasii, the rock elm or cork elm, is a deciduous tree native primarily to the Midwestern United States. The tree ranges from southern Ontario and Quebec, south to Tennessee, west to northeastern Kansas, and north to Minnesota.

Winged elm​
Winged elm​

Winged elm tree information suggests that the trees are not difficult to grow and require little care in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 6 through 9. The winged elm is the least shade tolerant of the North American elms, but you can plant it either in sun or partial shade.

Related Types