A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Endocrine

Adrenal
Adrenal

Your adrenal glands are controlled by your pituitary gland, another part of your endocrine system. Located in your head, your pituitary gland is the main controller of your endocrine glands. Abnormal signals can disrupt the amount of hormones that your pituitary gland tells your adrenal glands to produce.

Adrenal Glands
Adrenal Glands

Your adrenal glands are controlled by your pituitary gland, another part of your endocrine system. Located in your head, your pituitary gland is the main controller of your endocrine glands. Abnormal signals can disrupt the amount of hormones that your pituitary gland tells your adrenal glands to produce.

Adrenal Insufficiency
Adrenal Insufficiency

Addison’s disease, the common term for primary adrenal insufficiency, occurs when the adrenal glands are damaged and cannot produce enough of the adrenal hormone cortisol. The adrenal hormone aldosterone may also be lacking.

source: niddk.nih.gov
Cushing's Disease
Cushing's Disease

Cushing’s syndrome affects about three times as many women as men. 2 In people who have type 2 diabetes and blood glucose levels that stay too high over time, along with high blood pressure, Cushing’s syndrome may be the cause.

source: niddk.nih.gov
Gigantism (Acromegaly) and Other Growth Hormone Problems
Gigantism (Acromegaly) and Other Growth Hormone Problems

gigantism (acromegaly) and other growth hormone problems can occur if the pituitary gland produces too much growth hormone. as a result, a child's bones and body parts may grow abnormally fast.

source: webmd.com
Hyperthyroidism
Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland is overactive and makes excessive amounts of thyroid hormone. Learn about the symptoms, causes, and treatment options for hyperthyroidism. Learn about the symptoms, causes, and treatment options for hyperthyroidism.

Hypoclycemia
Hypoclycemia

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is a disorder that most commonly affects people with diabetes, but it can also affect those without diabetes. People who do not have diabetes but who exhibit signs and/or symptoms of hypoglycemia may need to undergo testing to pinpoint the cause.

Hypothalamus
Hypothalamus

The Hypothalamus Essentials. The portion of the brain that maintains the body’s internal balance (homeostasis). The hypothalamus is the link between the endocrine and nervous systems. The hypothalamus produces releasing and inhibiting hormones, which stop and start the production of other hormones throughout the body.

Hypothyroidism
Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism (Underactive Thyroid) Part 1: Too Little Thyroid Hormone Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the body lacks sufficient thyroid hormone. Since the main purpose of thyroid hormone is to "run the body's metabolism," it is understandable that people with this condition will have symptoms associated with a slow metabolism.

Metabolic Disorder
Metabolic Disorder

Other endocrine disorders: Disorders of the other endocrine glands are less common. The expertise of an endocrinologist often is needed to select the most efficient diagnostic approach, assess the need for treatment, select the best treatment approach, and assure a favorable outcome.

image: pss.org.sg
Pancreas
Pancreas

The pancreas is a glandular organ in the upper abdomen, but really it serves as two glands in one: a digestive exocrine gland and a hormone-producing endocrine gland. Functioning as an exocrine gland, the pancreas excretes enzymes to break down the proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids in food.

source: innerbody.com
Parathyroids
Parathyroids

When the calcium level is normal or gets a little too high, normal parathyroids will stop releasing PTH. Proper calcium balance is crucial to the normal functioning of the heart, nervous system, kidneys, and bones.

image: drugline.org
Pineal Body
Pineal Body

Pineal Gland Essentials. Of the endocrine organs, the function of the pineal gland was the last discovered. Located deep in the center of the brain, the pineal gland was once known as the “third eye.” The pineal gland produces melatonin, which helps maintain circadian rhythm and regulate reproductive hormones.

Pineal Gland
Pineal Gland

The pineal gland is the most mysterious organ in the endocrine system. It is influenced by light and produces the hormone melatonin, which affects your circadian rhythm and sleep cycles. It is influenced by light and produces the hormone melatonin, which affects your circadian rhythm and sleep cycles.

Pituitary Gland
Pituitary Gland

The pituitary gland is often dubbed the “master gland” because its hormones control other parts of the endocrine system, namely the thyroid gland, adrenal glands, ovaries, and testes. However, the pituitary doesn’t entirely run the show.

Reproductive Glands
Reproductive Glands

The major glands of the endocrine system are the hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid, parathyroids, adrenals, pineal body, and the reproductive organs (ovaries and testes). The pancreas is also a part of this system; it has a role in hormone production as well as in digestion.

Thymus
Thymus

The thymus gland, located behind your sternum and between your lungs, is only active until puberty. After puberty, the thymus starts to slowly shrink and become replaced by fat. Thymosin is the hormone of the thymus, and it stimulates the development of disease-fighting T cells.

Thyroid
Thyroid

The thyroid, located in your neck, is a large endocrine gland that regulates your metabolism. It produces two main hormones to fulfill this role. The thyroid is associated with many distinct disorders, including hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism.

Thyroid Cancer
Thyroid Cancer

A thyroid gland that has a thyroid cancer nodule within it and has multiple other nodules in both sides of the thyroid or when cancer has spread to lymph nodes in the neck is a clear indication for complete removal of the thyroid gland.

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