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Types of Epilepsy

Abdominal Epilepsy
Abdominal Epilepsy

Those symptoms include: abdominal pain, usually sharp or cramping and lasting seconds to minutes. nausea and/or vomiting. fatigue, lethargy, or sleep following seizures. altered level of consciousness, such as confusion or unresponsiveness. convulsive seizures known as generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

source: webmd.com
Autosomal Dominant Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy
Autosomal Dominant Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is an uncommon form of epilepsy that runs in families. This disorder causes seizures that usually occur at night (nocturnally) while an affected person is sleeping. Some people with ADNFLE also have seizures during the day.

Benign Infantile Epilepsy
Benign Infantile Epilepsy

Benign infantile epilepsy (BIE), also known as benign infantile seizures (BIS), is an epilepsy syndrome of which several forms have been described. The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classify two main forms of the syndrome (familial and nonfamilial)[1] though several other forms have been described in the academic literature.

Childhood Absence Epilepsy
Childhood Absence Epilepsy

Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is an epilepsy syndrome with absence seizures that begin in young children. Absence seizures look like staring spells during which the child is not aware or responsive. The child's eyes may roll up briefly or the eyes may blink.

source: epilepsy.com
Early Myoclonic Encephalopathy
Early Myoclonic Encephalopathy

Early Myoclonic Encephalopathy (EME) is a rare epilepsy syndrome seen in neonates and infants. It is also known as neonatal myoclonic encephalopathy. It is usually diagnosed before 3 months of age.

source: epilepsy.com
Epilepsia Partialis Continua
Epilepsia Partialis Continua

Epilepsia partialis continua (also called Kojevnikov's or Kozhevnikov's epilepsia) is a rare type of brain disorder in which a patient experiences recurrent motor epileptic seizures that are focal (hands and face), and recur every few seconds or minutes for extended periods (days or years).

Epileptic Spasms
Epileptic Spasms

Epileptic spasms. Epileptic spasms, also known as infantile spasms, juvenile spasms, or West syndrome is an uncommon-to-rare epileptic disorder in infants, children and adults. It is named after the English physician, William James West (1793–1848), who first described it in an article published in The Lancet in 1841.

Frontal Lobe Epilepsy
Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

Frontal lobe epilepsy, or FLE, is a neurological disorder that is characterized by brief, recurring seizures that arise in the frontal lobes of the brain, often while the patient is sleeping.

Generalised Epilepsy
Generalised Epilepsy

Generalized seizures, which are different from partial seizures, appear to start in all parts of the brain simultaneously and have no identifiable onset. Many generalized seizures start and spread so quickly it is impossible to identify the source.

Generalized Epilepsy With Febrile Seizures Plus
Generalized Epilepsy With Febrile Seizures Plus

Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a syndromic autosomal dominant disorder where afflicted individuals can exhibit numerous epilepsy phenotypes.[1] GEFS+ can persist beyond early childhood (i.e., 6 years of age).

Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy
Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is a group of epileptic disorders that are believed to have a strong underlying genetic basis. Patients with an IGE subtype are typically otherwise normal and have no structural brain abnormalities.

Lafora Disease
Lafora Disease

Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and a decline in intellectual function. The signs and symptoms of the disorder usually appear in late childhood or adolescence and worsen with time.

LandauKleffner Syndrome
LandauKleffner Syndrome

Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare form of epilepsy. LKS usually begins in children between 2 and 8 years old. It affects both sexes equally. A progressive loss of speech is typically seen in a child with previous age-appropriate development. It usually affects the child's understanding of spoken language the most.

source: epilepsy.com
LennoxGastaut Syndrome
LennoxGastaut Syndrome

What Is Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome? Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a rare and severe kind of epilepsy that starts in childhood.Children with LGS have seizures often, and they have several different kinds of seizures.

source: webmd.com
MERRF Syndrome
MERRF Syndrome

MERRF syndrome (or myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibers) is a mitochondrial disease. It is extremely rare, with an estimated prevalence of 1/4,000 in Northern Europe, and has varying degrees of expressivity owing to heteroplasmy.

image: youtube.com
Myoclonic Astatic Epilepsy
Myoclonic Astatic Epilepsy

Myoclonic astatic epilepsy (MAE), also known as Doose syndrome, is an epilepsy syndrome of early childhood usually characterized by difficult to control generalized seizures. Children will experience drop and staring seizures, sometimes associated with falls.

Myoclonic Epilepsy
Myoclonic Epilepsy

Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a type of epilepsy that starts in in childhood or the teen years. People who have it wake up from sleep with quick, jerking movements of their arms and legs. These are called myoclonic jerks.

source: webmd.com
Nocturnal Epilepsy
Nocturnal Epilepsy

Nocturnal seizures can also occur upon waking. Most often, nocturnal seizures are partial seizures. Nocturnal seizures are associated with certain types of epilepsy, including: juvenile myoclonic ; awakening grand mal ; benign rolandic, also called benign focal epilepsy of childhood; electrical status epilepticus of sleep; Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) frontal onset seizures ; Nocturnal seizures disrupt sleep.

Ohtahara Syndrome
Ohtahara Syndrome

Ohtahara Syndrome (OS) is a rare epilepsy syndrome seen in neonates/infants. It is also known as early infantile epileptic encephalopathy or early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with burst suppression pattern.

source: epilepsy.com
Panayiotopoulos Syndrome
Panayiotopoulos Syndrome

Panayiotopoulos Syndrome (PS), also known as early onset occipital epilepsy, is a common childhood epilepsy syndrome with partial (also called focal) seizures. It emerges in mid-childhood usually between the ages of 3-10 years.

source: epilepsy.com
Photosensitive Epilepsy
Photosensitive Epilepsy

WebMD explains the triggers, symptoms, and prevention of photosensitive epilepsy.

source: webmd.com
image: youtube.com
Post-Traumatic Epilepsy
Post-Traumatic Epilepsy

Brain damage or brain injury occurs when the brain cells known as neurons are destroyed. This can be caused by internal or external mechanisms. When the damage is related to an external physical trauma, the term traumatic brain injury (TBI) is used.

source: epilepsy.com
Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy
Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy

Progressive myoclonus epilepsy. Progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) is a rare epilepsy syndrome caused by a variety of genetic disorders. The syndrome includes myoclonic seizures and tonic-clonic seizures together with progressive neurological decline.

Pyridoxine-Dependent Epilepsy
Pyridoxine-Dependent Epilepsy

Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy is a condition that involves seizures beginning in infancy or, in some cases, before birth. Those affected typically experience prolonged seizures lasting several minutes (status epilepticus).

Rasmussen's Encephalitis
Rasmussen's Encephalitis

Rasmussen's encephalitis. [edit on Wikidata] Rasmussen's encephalitis, also known as chronic focal encephalitis (CFE), is a rare inflammatory neurological disease, characterized by frequent and severe seizures, loss of motor skills and speech, hemiparesis (weakness on one side of the body), encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), and dementia.

image: quazoo.com
Reflex Seizure
Reflex Seizure

Reflex seizures may occur in reflex epilepsy (also known as environmental epilepsy).[1] They may also occur in other epilepsy syndromes or independently.[1] They are seizures which are the result of sensory stimulation caused by the environment.[1] The best known is photosensitive epilepsy.

Rolandic Epilepsy
Rolandic Epilepsy

WebMD explains benign rolandic epilepsy, including its symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatments.

source: webmd.com
Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a chronic disorder of the nervous system characterized by recurrent, unprovoked focal seizures that originate in the temporal lobe of the brain and last about one or two minutes.