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Types of Eruption

Hydrothermal Eruption
Hydrothermal Eruption

A new hydrothermal eruption was observed at New Zealand's Lake Rotorua at 15:30 UTC on November 27, 2016, prompting an evacuation of at least one house near the lake. The style of the eruption was one which hadn't been seen in Rotorua since about 2000 or 2001 and was slightly anomalous, GeoNet said.

source: watchers.news
image: gns.cri.nz
Lava
Lava

A Surtseyan eruption (or hydrovolcanic) is a type of volcanic eruption caused by shallow-water interactions between water and lava, named so after its most famous example, the eruption and formation of the island of Surtsey off the coast of Iceland in 1963.

Phreatic Eruption
Phreatic Eruption

What Is A Phreatic Eruption? When magma heats ground or surface water, it results in an explosion of water, steam, rock, and ash, called a phreatic eruption. A scheme of a phreatic eruption: 1: water vapor cloud, 2: magma conduit, 3: layers of lava and ash, 4: stratum, 5: water table, 6: explosion, 7: magma chamber.

Phreatomagmatic Eruption
Phreatomagmatic Eruption

Unlike phreatic eruptions, the products of phreatomagmatic eruptions contain juvenile (magmatic) clasts. It is common for a large explosive eruption to have magmatic and phreatomagmatic components.

image: swisseduc.ch
Strombolian and Hawaiian Eruptions
Strombolian and Hawaiian Eruptions

Strombolian Eruption. Strombolian eruptions are distinct bursts of fluid lava (usually basalt or basaltic andesite) from the mouth of a magma-filled summit conduit. The explosions usually occur every few minutes at regular or irregular intervals. The explosions of lava, which can reach heights of hundreds of meters, are caused by the bursting of large bubbles of gas, which travel upward in the magma-filled conduit until they reach the open air.

source: geology.com
Subplinian and Plinian Eruptions
Subplinian and Plinian Eruptions

Plinian eruptions or Vesuvian eruptions are volcanic eruptions marked by their similarity to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, which destroyed the ancient Roman cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The eruption was described in a letter written by Pliny the Younger, after the death of his uncle Pliny the Elder.

Vulcanian Eruptions
Vulcanian Eruptions

Vulcanian eruptions display several common characteristics. The mass of rock ejected during the eruption is usually between 10 2 - 10 6 tonnes and contains a high proportion of non-juvinial material (> 50%).

image: swisseduc.ch

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