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Types of Evergreens

Blue Spruce
Blue Spruce

Colorado blue spruce trees are valuable in deer country, as their prickly texture and strong smell render them conveniently deer-resistant. In the snowy North, where landscapes can look barren in winter, evergreens such as Colorado blue spruce trees can provide much-needed winter interest.

source: thespruce.com
Blue Spruce​
Blue Spruce​

Colorado blue spruce trees do not need to be pruned, but they can be pruned if you wish to promote denser foliage. Prune off half of the fresh growth on each candle (that is, the tip at which branch growth occurs each year) in spring. Make sure to water young plants during dry spells.

source: thespruce.com
Eastern Hemlock
Eastern Hemlock

Eastern hemlock is a graceful native evergreen tree. This conifer is unusual in that the terminal leader often droops instead of giving the tree a typical pointed top like that of most trees in the pine family.

source: nps.gov
Eastern ​Hemlock​
Eastern ​Hemlock​

Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) Robert H. Mohlenbrock (USDA) Scientific Name: Tsuga canadensis Kingdom: Plantae - Plants Division: Coniferophyta - Conifers Class: Pinopsida - Conifers Family: Pinaceae - Pine family Genus: Tsuga Carr. - hemlock Life Cycle: Perennial. Description: Eastern hemlock is a graceful native evergreen tree.

source: nps.gov
Jack Pine
Jack Pine

Jack pine (Pinus banksiana) is an eastern North American pine. Its native range in Canada is east of the Rocky Mountains from the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories to Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, and the north-central and northeast of the United States from Minnesota to Maine, with the southernmost part of the range just into northwest Indiana and northwest Pennsylvania.

image: treetime.ca
Jack Pine​
Jack Pine​

Jack pine (Pinus banksiana) is an eastern North American pine. Its native range in Canada is east of the Rocky Mountains from the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories to Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, and the north-central and northeast of the United States from Minnesota to Maine, with the southernmost part of the range just into northwest Indiana and northwest Pennsylvania.

image: treetime.ca
Mountain Hemlock
Mountain Hemlock

Alpine Fir and Mountain Hemlock at our nursery. We believe we have the best selection of these trees in the Northwest. That said, our availability of these trees is constantly changing; please contact us to confirm availability. Prices & Availability Each if these trees is unique, and so we price these trees individually. Please contact us for more information.

Mountain ​Hemlock​
Mountain ​Hemlock​

Tsuga mertensiana, known as mountain hemlock, is a species of hemlock native to the west coast of North America, with its northwestern limit on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, and its southeastern limit in northern Tulare County, California.

image: seattle.gov
Scots Pine​
Scots Pine​

Scots pine has also been widely planted in New Zealand and much of the colder regions of North America; it was one of the first trees introduced to North America, in about 1600. It is listed as an invasive species in some areas there, including Ontario, Michigan and Wisconsin.

image: ebay.com
Tsuga ​Caroliniana​
Tsuga ​Caroliniana​

Tsuga caroliniana, the Carolina hemlock, is a species of Tsuga, native to the Appalachian Mountains in southwest Virginia, western North Carolina, extreme northeast Georgia, northwest South Carolina, and eastern Tennessee.

Tsuga ​Chinensis​
Tsuga ​Chinensis​

Tsuga (Tsuga canadensis) essential oil The wood obtained from hemlocks is important in the timber industry, especially for use as wood pulp. Many species are used in horticulture, and numerous cultivars have been selected for use in gardens.

Tsuga ​Sieboldii​
Tsuga ​Sieboldii​

Tsuga (/ ˈ s uː ɡ ə /, from Japanese: 栂 (ツガ), the name of Tsuga sieboldii) is a genus of conifers in the subfamily Abietoideae. The common name hemlock is derived from a perceived similarity in the smell of its crushed foliage to that of the unrelated plant poison hemlock.

image: quazoo.com
Western Hemlock
Western Hemlock

Western hemlock trees in Olympic National Park, Washington - photo by Tom Green on Flickr - noncommercial use permitted with attribution / share alike. Official State Tree of Washington Washington designated the western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) as the official state tree in 1947 (Washington is known as the evergreen state).

Western ​Hemlock​
Western ​Hemlock​

A large evergreen coniferous tree native to the west coast of North America, the western hemlock tree is the largest species of hemlock (growing an average of 50 - 70 meters tall, and sometimes to 78 meters) with a trunk diameter of up to 2.7 meters.

Western ​Redcedar​
Western ​Redcedar​

The Western Red Cedar is very commonly found in the wild in the northwestern United States and Canada. In cultivation, it can be effectively used as a hedge or screen. Foliage is glossy, green and scale-like and is aromatic.

source: treehelp.com
White fir​
White fir​

Abies concolor, the white fir, ... This large evergreen coniferous tree grows best in the central Sierra Nevada of California, ...