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Types of Explosives

Ammonal: Ammonium Nitrate and Aluminium Powder
Ammonal: Ammonium Nitrate and Aluminium Powder

Ammonal is an explosive made up of ammonium nitrate and aluminium powder, not to be confused with T-ammonal which contains trinitrotoluene as well to increase properties such as brisance. The ammonium nitrate functions as an oxidizer and the aluminium as fuel.

Armstrong's Mixture: Potassium Chlorate and red Phosphorus
Armstrong's Mixture: Potassium Chlorate and red Phosphorus

Armstrong's mixture is a highly sensitive primary explosive. Its primary ingredients are red phosphorus and strong oxidizer, such as potassium chlorate and potassium perchlorate. Sulfur is used to substitute for some or all of the phosphorus to slightly decrease sensitivity and lower costs; calcium carbonate may also be present in small proportions.

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Black Powder
Black Powder

explosive: Black powder It may never be known with certainty who invented the first explosive, black powder, which is a mixture of saltpetre (potassium nitrate), sulfur, and charcoal (carbon). The consensus is…

Black Powder: Potassium Nitrate, Charcoal and Sulfur
Black Powder: Potassium Nitrate, Charcoal and Sulfur

Black powder is a simple mixture of powdered potassium nitrate or saltpeter, charcoal and sulfur. But simply mixing the ingredients together is not going to give you the results you are looking for. Follow these instructions on making black powder--just be careful as you are working with explosives.

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Dynamite Ammonium Nitrate Low-Freezing Dynamite
Dynamite Ammonium Nitrate Low-Freezing Dynamite

Introduction Types of chemical explosives Black powder Nitroglycerin Dynamite Ammonium nitrate Low-freezing dynamite. Attempts to reduce the freezing point of nitroglycerin began shortly after the Nobels introduced it commercially. Frozen dynamite is very insensitive, sometimes so much so that it will not give dependable performance, and it is difficult to use, since it cannot be punched for ...

Flash Powder
Flash Powder

Normally, flash powder mixtures are compounded to achieve a particular purpose. These mixtures range from extremely fast-burning mixtures designed to produce a maximum audio report, to mixtures designed to burn slowly and provide large amounts of illumination, to mixtures that were formerly used in photography.

Introduction
Introduction

Introduction to Explosives. FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY All dynamite is considered a secondary high explosive and can be initiated with a blasting cap

Modern High Explosives Ammonium Nitrate–Fuel oil Mixtures
Modern High Explosives Ammonium Nitrate–Fuel oil Mixtures

explosive - Modern high explosives - The year 1955, marking the beginning of the most revolutionary change in the explosives industry since the invention of dynamite, saw the development of ammonium nitrate–fuel oil mixtures (ANFO) and ammonium nitrate-base water gels, which together now account for at least 70 percent of the high explosives consumption in the United States.

Nitrocellulosic Explosives
Nitrocellulosic Explosives

Nitrocellulosic explosives. When Christian Schoenbein invented nitrocotton in 1845 by dipping cotton in a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids and then removing the acids by washing with water, he hoped to obtain a propellant for military weapons. It proved, however, to be too fast and violent.

Nitroglycerin
Nitroglycerin

Nitroglycerin (NG), also known as nitroglycerine, trinitroglycerin (TNG), trinitroglycerine, nitro, glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), or 1,2,3-trinitroxypropane, is a heavy, colorless, oily, explosive liquid most commonly produced by nitrating glycerol with white fuming nitric acid under conditions appropriate to the formation of the nitric acid ester.

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Other Explosives Chlorates and Perchlorates Sprengel Explosives
Other Explosives Chlorates and Perchlorates Sprengel Explosives

Other explosives Chlorates and perchlorates Interest in the chlorates and perchlorates (salts of chloric or perchloric acid) as a base for explosives dates back to 1788.

Types of Chemical Explosives
Types of Chemical Explosives

Types of explosives Explosives can be classified into one of four large categories: primary, low, high, and nuclear explosives. Primary explosives. Primary explosives are generally used to set off other explosives. They are very sensitive to shock, heat, and electricity and, therefore, must be handled with great care.

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