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Types of eye Colors

Amber
Amber

Amber Eyes: Interesting Facts Surrounding This Rare Eye Color Amber eyes are the world's most rare occurrence. The eyes present with a yellow-copper tint due to a yellow colored pigment known as lipochrome. This type of eye color is most common in Asia and South America, yet still, its occurrence remains slight.

Blue
Blue

All blue eyes are not created equal because eye color is determined by many different gene combinations, as seen in the image below: The colored part of the eye is called the iris. The iris has pigmentation that determines the eye color.

source: edow.com
Brown
Brown

Brown is the most common eye color. Individuals with brown eyes have more melanin present, and over half of the people in the world have brown eyes. Gray eyes may be called “blue” at first glance, but they tend to have flecks of gold and brown.

source: edow.com
Gray
Gray

Gray eyes may be called “blue” at first glance, but they tend to have flecks of gold and brown. And they may appear to “change color” from gray to blue to green depending on clothing, lighting, and mood (which may change the size of the pupil, compressing the colors of the iris).

source: edow.com
Green
Green

Hazel eyes mostly consist of shades of brown and green. Much like gray eyes, hazel eyes may appear to “change color” from green to light brown to gold. Individuals whose eyes appear to be one color closest to the pupil, another color a little farther our, and another color around the edge of the iris are likely to have hazel eyes.

source: edow.com
Hazel
Hazel

Also, eye color can change dramatically in the first few years of life; many white, non-Hispanic babies are born with blue eyes and then develop brown, green or hazel eyes in childhood. This phenomenon has little to do with genetics, but it does help explain where hazel eyes come from.

Red and Violet
Red and Violet

Eyes can look violet when this red color combines with the bluish color of the iris that results from a lack of melanin, and the aforementioned light-scattering effects. In fact, the reason the eyes look red is the same reason you might have red-eye in a photograph, which results from light reflecting off the back of the eye and passing back out through the iris.

source: owlcation.com
Spectrum of eye Color
Spectrum of eye Color

There are no clear boundaries on the true spectrum of possible eye colors. This makes it difficult to see where a blue shade become gray, where green approaches hazel or where brown turns to amber. Therefore, if one does not know one’s exact eye color then one can only approximate by choosing a known eye color that best matches one’s eyes.

source: hubpages.com