A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Federal Courts

Article I Courts
Article I Courts

ARTICLE I COURTS. These are courts created by Congress under its power under Article I of the Constitution, and include: TERRITORIAL COURTS. There are federal courts located in the districts of Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Northern Mariana Islands.

source: lectlaw.com
Bankruptcy Courts
Bankruptcy Courts

A bankruptcy case normally begins when the debtor files a petition with the bankruptcy court. A petition may be filed by an individual, by spouses together, or by a corporation or other entity. All bankruptcy cases are handled in federal courts under rules outlined in the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

source: uscourts.gov
Coroners Court
Coroners Court

A coroner is a person whose standard role is to confirm and certify the death of an individual within a jurisdiction. A coroner may also conduct or order an inquest into the manner or cause of death, and investigate or confirm the identity of an unknown person who has been found dead within the coroner's jurisdiction.

Court of Appeal
Court of Appeal

In the federal system, 94 district courts are organized into 12 circuits, or regions. Each circuit has its own Court of Appeals that reviews cases decided in U.S. District Courts within the circuit. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit brings the number of federal appellate courts to 13.

source: uscourts.gov
Courts of Appeals
Courts of Appeals

In the federal system, 94 district courts are organized into 12 circuits, or regions. Each circuit has its own Court of Appeals that reviews cases decided in U.S. District Courts within the circuit. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit brings the number of federal appellate courts to 13. This court takes cases from across the nation, but only particular types of cases.

source: uscourts.gov
image: cbsnews.com
District Courts
District Courts

The Supreme Court is the highest court in the United States. Article III of the U.S. Constitution created the Supreme Court and authorized Congress to pass laws establishing a system of lower courts. In the federal court system’s present form, 94 district level trial courts and 13 courts of appeals sit below the Supreme Court.

source: uscourts.gov
Family Court
Family Court

About Federal Courts The U.S. Courts were created under Article III of the Constitution to administer justice fairly and impartially, within the jurisdiction established by the Constitution and Congress. This section will help you learn more about the Judicial Branch and its work.

source: uscourts.gov
Family Violence Courts
Family Violence Courts

The courts recognise the close connection between family breakdown and violence, and the detrimental impact on both adult victims and children living with family violence. Protecting family members, and particularly children, from the effects of family violence is central to all determinations of what is in a child’s best interest.

High Court
High Court

The High Court of Justice is, together with the Court of Appeal and the Crown Court, one of the Senior Courts of England and Wales. Its name is abbreviated as EWHC for legal citation purposes.

Supreme Court
Supreme Court

About Federal Courts The U.S. Courts were created under Article III of the Constitution to administer justice fairly and impartially, within the jurisdiction established by the Constitution and Congress.

source: uscourts.gov
Youth Court
Youth Court

About Federal Courts The U.S. Courts were created under Article III of the Constitution to administer justice fairly and impartially, within the jurisdiction established by the Constitution and Congress.

source: uscourts.gov