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Types of Firefighters

Assistant Chief
Assistant Chief

Fire Chief The chief is, as you’d expect, the main leader and supervisor of the applicable unit. The applicable unit may vary, as determined by the factors covered elsewhere, including, but not limited to, the section immediately following herein.

Battalion Chief
Battalion Chief

Fire suppression, fire prevention, inspections, firefighter training and maintenance of all equipment and facilities within a battalion are all normally the fire chief's responsibilities. In keeping with their executive roles, battalion fire chiefs also have many budget-related duties.

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Captain
Captain

Captain is a rank in various fire services. In most American and Canadian fire services, a captain ranks above a lieutenant and below a Battalion Chief. This varies, though, between departments – in the Boston Fire Department, the captain is the officer in overall charge of a fire company.

Class A – Ordinary Combustible Fires
Class A – Ordinary Combustible Fires

Fires are classified by the types of fuel they burn. Class A. Class A Fires consist of ordinary combustibles such as wood, paper, trash or anything else that leaves an ash. Water works best to extinguish a Class A fire. Class B. Class B Fires are fueled by flammable or combustible liquids, which include oil, gasoline, and other similar materials.

Class B – Flammable Liquids
Class B – Flammable Liquids

We will teach you everything about dangerous Class B fires and the different Class B Fire Extinguishers to fight them to keep you safe.

Class C – Flammable Gases
Class C – Flammable Gases

What is a Class C fire? Class C fires are identified by the presence of a burning gas. The most common flammable gases involved in fires are propane, butane and methane, and they form the ‘fuel’ aspect of the fire triangle, which is required for the fire to start, spread and continue to burn.

Class D – Metal Fires
Class D – Metal Fires

Fighting Class D Fires. Similar to class C flames, water cannot be used on fires that burn metal. Spraying water on a class D fire will actually serve to energize the flames, potentially spreading the fire and creating additional heat and damage.

Class F – Cooking oil Fires
Class F – Cooking oil Fires

What is a Class F fire? Class F fires are fires which involve cooking oil or fat. Though technically a sub-class of fires caused by flammable liquids or gases, they differ from conventional fires due to the extremely high temperatures involved.

Driver Engineer
Driver Engineer

Firefighters can reach emergencies and fight fires through their fire trucks. These vehicles are driven by engineer firemen, who are also known as fire engineers. Not surprisingly, their job comes with a higher-than-average rate of injury and illness, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. To minimize hazards, all firefighters wear protective gear and practice safety procedures.

Electrical Fires
Electrical Fires

According to the U.S. Fire Administration, in 2014, electrical fires accounted for 6.3 percent, nearly 24,000 fires, of all residential fires, 11 percent of the fires where someone died and 7 percent of the fires where someone was injured.

Fire Chief
Fire Chief

The fire chief is responsible for carrying out the day-to-day tasks of running a firefighting organization. Such tasks include supervising other officers and firefighters at an emergency scene and recruiting, training, and equipping them for their respective duties.

Firefighter
Firefighter

NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) is responsible for occupational health programs and standards in firefighters which discusses what hearing sensitivity is required to work as a firefighter, but also enforces baseline (initial) and annual hearing tests (based on OSHA hearing maintenance regulations).

Lieutenant
Lieutenant

Irving Fire Department firefighters start at $51,768 per year and receive pay raises at regular intervals. A firefighter may finish their career making a salary of $72,840 per year without a promotion. This is comparable to other departments in the Dallas/Ft-Worth area.

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Probationary Firefighter
Probationary Firefighter

A Probationary Firefighter (PFF), also known as a Rookie Firefighter, a Candidate Firefighter, or Probie for short, is any firefighter in their first 6–18 months of service in a particular fire department. The title of Probationary Firefighter is generally the lowest rank in a fire department's rank structure.

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