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Types of Fronts

Arctic Maritime
Arctic Maritime

In meteorology, an air mass is a volume of air defined by its temperature and water vapor content. Air masses cover many thousands or billions of square miles, and adapt to the characteristics of the surface below them. They are classified according to latitude and their continental or maritime source regions.

Polar Continental
Polar Continental

How are fronts created. as air masses move and meet each other. Severe weather occurs along. boundaries between air masses, at the fronts. The conditions of air in the air mass associated with. place air mass originated. Example: Continental Polar air mass originates or forms over continent in polar region.

source: quizlet.com
image: quia.com
Polar Maritime
Polar Maritime

Start studying Earth Space Science - Fronts and Air Masses. Learn vocabulary, ... W indicates during spring when continental polar air clashes with maritime tropical air.

source: quizlet.com
Returning Polar Maritime
Returning Polar Maritime

Returning polar maritime is another version of polar maritime, but this time with a longer sea track which takes the air first southwards over the North-Atlantic, the north-eastwards across the British isles.

image: metlink.org
Tropical Continental
Tropical Continental

Start studying Earth Space Science - Fronts and Air Masses. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, ... Continental Tropical (cT) *Hot and very dry

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Tropical Maritime
Tropical Maritime

Maritime tropical air masses originate over the warm waters of the tropics and Gulf of Mexico, where heat and moisture are transferred to the overlying air from the waters below. The northward movement of tropical air masses transports warm moist air into the United States, increasing the potential for precipitation.