A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Funeral Flowers

Carnation​
Carnation​

Carnations are often used in funeral wreaths and standing sprays. As with other flowers, each of the colors has its own meaning. The red shows affection and the white tends to symbolize innocence.

source: everplans.com
Chrysanthemum​
Chrysanthemum​

The chrysanthemum is the official flower of the city of Salinas, California. The yellow chrysanthemum is the official flower of the fraternity Phi Kappa Sigma, the sorority Sigma Alpha and the pharmacy fraternity Lambda Kappa Sigma. Others. The chrysanthemum is also the flower of November.

Gladiolus​
Gladiolus​

Gladiolus flowers bloom on a long spike that ranges from 2 to 4 feet tall. These attractive flowers open from the bottom and work their way upwards creating a long spire of blooms. They create an impressive backdrop in flowerbeds, but are often grown in cutting gardens to use in floral displays.

Hydrangea​
Hydrangea​

Hydrangea The meaning behind this flower is not as well-known as the others, but many believe it symbolizes true heartfelt emotions. Guru Tip: As with the peace lily, the plant version of this flower will always last longer than the cut arrangement.

source: everplans.com
Lily​
Lily​

When someone says, “This place smells like a funeral home” chances are there is a lily nearby. This is often considered the go-to funeral flower and there’s significant meaning behind this strongly aromatic blossom.

source: everplans.com
Orchids​
Orchids​

Guru Tip: Orchid plants make particularly special gifts. Unlike orchids in an arrangement, these last longer in the home or office. Chrysanthemums (“Mums”) Unlike other flowers, the meaning behind chrysanthemums varies globally. In America and Europe, the meanings focus on sympathy and honor. The color plays a role in the meaning as well.

source: everplans.com
Rose​
Rose​

The yellow rose is often given by friends to show their bond. The rarer dark pink roses are used to express thankfulness to the deceased. Guru Tip: Roses can be mixed in with other flowers or uses in a casket spray, standing spray, or wreath.

source: everplans.com
Tulip​
Tulip​

Meaning & Symbolism of Tulip Shop for Tulips Originally from Persia and Turkey, tulips were brought to Europe in the 16th century, where they got their common name from the Turkish word for gauze (with which turbans were wrapped) - reflecting the turban-like appearance of a tulip in full bloom.

source: teleflora.com