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Types of Geology

Additional Branches
Additional Branches

Additional Branches. Benthic Ecology. Benthic ecology is the study of living things on the seafloor and how they interact with their environment. Biostratigraphy. Biostratigraphy is the branch of stratigraphy that uses fossils to establish relative ages of rock and correlate successions of sedimentary rocks within and between depositional basins.

source: quora.com
Carbonates eg Calcite, Magnesite, Dolomite
Carbonates eg Calcite, Magnesite, Dolomite

Dolomite, also known as "dolostone" and "dolomite rock," is a sedimentary rock composed primarily of the mineral dolomite, CaMg(CO 3) 2. Dolomite is found in sedimentary basins worldwide. It is thought to form by the postdepositional alteration of lime mud and limestone by magnesium-rich groundwater.

source: geology.com
Geochemistry
Geochemistry

Geochemistry is the science that uses the tools and principles of chemistry to explain the mechanisms behind major geological systems such as the Earth's crust and its oceans.

Halides eg
Halides eg

Introducing the halides and evaporites including borax, fluorite and halite, which are popular minerals in the geology field. Introducing the halides and evaporites including borax, fluorite and halite, which are popular minerals in the geology field. Evaporite Minerals and Halides. Search the site GO. Science. Geology Basics Types of Rocks Geologic Features Geologic Processes Plate Tectonics ...

source: thoughtco.com
Hydroxides eg Goethite, Brucite
Hydroxides eg Goethite, Brucite

Hydroxides. eg. Goethite, brucite. Sulfides. eg. Pyrite, galena, sphalerite. Sulfates. eg. Baryte, gypsum. Carbonates. eg. Calcite, magnesite, dolomite. Phosphates. eg. Apatite, monazite. Halides. eg. Fluorite, halite (rock salt). Silicates (most common) Orthosilicates. eg. Garnet, olivine. Ring silicates. eg. Tourmaline, beryl. Chain silicates. eg.

source: quora.com
Native Elements
Native Elements

Rocks and Minerals Native Elements. Native elements are minerals composed of only one element, such as copper, sulfur, gold, silver, and diamonds.

source: uky.edu
Oceanography
Oceanography

Many different sciences are used to learn about the Earth; however, the four basic areas of Earth science study are: geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. A brief explanation of these sciences is provided below.

source: geology.com
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Oxides eg Corundum (Incl Sapphire), Hematite, Spinel
Oxides eg Corundum (Incl Sapphire), Hematite, Spinel

Oxides. eg corundum (incl. sapphire), hematite, spinel. Hydroxides. eg. Goethite, brucite. Sulfides. eg. Pyrite, galena, sphalerite. Sulfates. eg. Baryte, gypsum. Carbonates. eg. Calcite, magnesite, dolomite. Phosphates. eg. Apatite, monazite. Halides. eg. Fluorite, halite (rock salt). Silicates (most common) Orthosilicates. eg. Garnet, olivine. Ring silicates. eg. Tourmaline, beryl. Chain silicates. eg.

source: quora.com
Paleontology
Paleontology

Paleontology incorporates knowledge from biology, geology, ecology, anthropology, archaeology, and even computer science to understand the processes that have led to the origination and eventual destruction of the different types of organisms since life arose.

Phosphates eg Apatite, Monazite
Phosphates eg Apatite, Monazite

The generic chemical formula for monazite, (Ce,La,Nd,Th)(PO4,SiO4), reveals that cerium, lanthanum, neodymium, and thorium can substitute for one another in the mineral's structure; and, substitution of silica for phosphate also occurs. Monazite is part of several solid-solution series with other minerals.

source: geology.com
Sedimentology
Sedimentology

Sedimentary Geology is a journal that rapidly publishes high quality, original research papers that cover all aspects of sediments and sedimentary... Sedimentary Geology is a journal that rapidly publishes high quality, original research papers that cover all aspects of sediments and sedimentary rocks at all spatial and temporal scales.

image: eas.unl.edu
Sulfates eg Baryte, Gypsum
Sulfates eg Baryte, Gypsum

Barite is barium sulfate (BaSO 4), a heavy mineral that commonly occurs as concretions in sedimentary rocks. In the loose sandstones of Oklahoma, barite forms "roses" like these. They're similar to gypsum roses, and sure enough, gypsum is also a sulfate mineral.

source: thoughtco.com
Sulfides eg Pyrite, Galena, Sphalerite
Sulfides eg Pyrite, Galena, Sphalerite

Sphalerite with Pyrite and Galena (#90) ‹ Linarite (#89) up Amethyst (#91) › Brassy bright cubes of pyrite to ¼" with etched dull galena masses and crystal aggregates of dark complex opaque lustrous sphalerite to ½" maximum dimension.

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