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Types of German

Bockwurst​
Bockwurst​

Bockwurst is a German sausage traditionally made from ground veal and pork (tending more towards veal, unlike bratwurst). Bockwurst is flavored with salt, white pepper and paprika. Other herbs, such as chives and parsley, are often also added and, in Germany, bockwurst is often smoked as well.

Bratwurst​
Bratwurst​

The name "Bratwurst" most often refers to a sausage made from pork in a natural casing and is grilled or fried in a pan. It is a favorite in Germany, with each region having its own specialty. Raw vs. Pre-Cooked Bratwurst Some Bratwurst are sold raw, while others are sold pre-cooked.

Cervelat​
Cervelat​

GermanDeli provides German & European food & groceries to US residents. No "handling" fees are charged. There is no minimum purchase. During "checkout" (before you need to provide a payment) you can get an estimate of shipping charges. If the actual shipping costs are lower than the estimate, your card will be charged the lower amount.

Frankfurter ​WüRstchen​
Frankfurter ​WüRstchen​

Original Frankfurter Würstchen served with potato salad. A Frankfurter Würstchen (German for Frankfurt sausage) is a thin parboiled sausage made of pure pork in a casing of sheep's intestine. The special taste is acquired by a special method of low temperature smoking.

Gelbwurst​
Gelbwurst​

And like most other German sausages, its name varies between regions, too: Gelbwurst is known as Bregen– or Brägenwurst in some parts of northern Germany (both also translating to “brain sausage”); and Kalbskäse or Weißer Fleischkäse in Bavaria, where it’s often prepared in baked loaf form, like Leberkäse.

Knackwurst​
Knackwurst​

Knackwurst (German pronunciation: [ˈknakˌvʊʁst] ( listen)) (in North America spelled knockwurst ( listen (help · info))) refers to a sausage type of northern German origin from the mid-16th century.

Landjäger​
Landjäger​

Landjäger is a semidried sausage traditionally made in Southern Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Alsace. It is popular as a snack food during activities such as hiking. It also has a history as soldier's food because it keeps without refrigeration and comes in single-meal portions.

Leberkäse​
Leberkäse​

Leberkäse (help · info) (German, literally means 'liver cheese'; sometimes spelled Leberkäs or Leberka(a)s in Austria and the Swabian, Bavarian and Franconian parts of Germany and Fleischkäse in Saarland, Baden, Switzerland and Tyrol), also called Leverkaas in Dutch, is a specialty food found in the south of Germany, in Austria and parts of Switzerland, similar to bologna sausage.

Liverwurst​
Liverwurst​

In Romania liverwurst is called lebar, but unlike the German sausage leberwurst that uses beef, the lebar uses only pork. Lebar is eaten mainly for the winter holidays. It tastes fragrant and sweet with liver pâté.

Teewurst​
Teewurst​

Teewurst is a German sausage made from two parts raw pork (and sometimes beef) and one part bacon; they are minced, seasoned and packed in casings (mostly porous artificial casings) before being smoked over beech wood.

Thuringian ​Sausage​
Thuringian ​Sausage​

Thuringian sausage, or in German Thüringer Rostbratwurst (short: Roster), is a unique sausage from the German state of Thuringia which has PGI status under EU law.

image: foodal.com
Weisswurst​
Weisswurst​

German Sausage Guide #2: Weisswurst What is Weisswurst? Weisswürste (“white sausages”) are a specialty from Bavaria that taste considerably better than they look: short, greyish white sausages made from a mixture of finely minced veal and back bacon stuffed into pork casings.

Wollwurst​
Wollwurst​

Wollwurst in gravy Wollwurst is a speciality similar to Weißwurst made from veal and pork. These sausages are also called "Nackerte", "Geschwollene", "Geschlagene" or "Oberländer" and are usually longer and thinner than Weißwürste.