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Types of German Sausage

Ahle Wurst​
Ahle Wurst​

German wurst, or sausage, comes in two basic categories: Fresh sausages— This includes sausages that are uncooked and ones that are cooked once but need recooking or reheating. Most are made of raw pork, veal or beef, bacon or ham, egg, pickling salt and spices, and are then cooked in water and sometimes lightly smoked.

source: foodwine.com
image: quazoo.com
Bierschinken​
Bierschinken​

The name “scalded sausage” (Brühwurst) comes from the fact that these sausages are scalded in hot water or steam. They need to be refrigerated and eaten as soon as possible. The most common types of scalded sausage are: Fleischwurst, Bierwurst, Jagdwurst, Bierschinken, Paprikawurst, and Zigeunerwurst (literally, “gypsy sausage”).

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Braunschweiger​
Braunschweiger​

Braunschweiger (named after Braunschweig, Germany) is the name for several types of sausages in different regions. In the German language, Braunschweiger is the demonym for people from Brunswick (German name, Braunschweig), but under German food law refers to a variety of mettwurst.

BrüHwurst​
BrüHwurst​

The German sausages are named by: The method of production (usually cooking). The type of meat, filler material or spice used. The region in which sausages were made. Sausage names like Bratwurst, Kochwurst, Rohwurst, Brühwurst, Blutwurst or Leberwurst do not represent a particular German sausage, but a sausage type which is made in a particular way.

Debrecener​
Debrecener​

A debrecener (Hungarian: debreceni kolbász, German: Debre(c)ziner, Italian: Salsiccia di Debrecen) is a pork sausage of uniform fine texture and reddish-orange colour, named after the Hungarian city of Debrecen.

Extrawurst​
Extrawurst​

Extrawurst can be either a type of cold cut or part of a German idiomatic expression. Sausage type. Extrawurst is a type of Austrian scalded cold cut. It is moist, light coloured, fine textured and made from a well-spiced mixture of beef, pork and bacon fat. In Austria, it is the most popular type of cold cut.

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Frankfurter ​Rindswurst​
Frankfurter ​Rindswurst​

Frankfurter Rindswurst (literally Frankfurt beef sausage) [also Rindswurst (literally beef sausage), Rote, Rote Wurst (literally red sausage)] is a kind of Brühwurst. It was first produced at the Gref-Völsing butcher's shop in Frankfurt in 1894.

Frankfurter ​WüRstchen​
Frankfurter ​WüRstchen​

Original Frankfurter Würstchen served with potato salad. A Frankfurter Würstchen (German for Frankfurt sausage) is a thin parboiled sausage made of pure pork in a casing of sheep's intestine. The special taste is acquired by a special method of low temperature smoking.

Gelbwurst​
Gelbwurst​

And like most other German sausages, its name varies between regions, too: Gelbwurst is known as Bregen– or Brägenwurst in some parts of northern Germany (both also translating to “brain sausage”); and Kalbskäse or Weißer Fleischkäse in Bavaria, where it’s often prepared in baked loaf form, like Leberkäse.

Ketwurst​
Ketwurst​

When you think of German sausage, you're probably thinking of a bratwurst. Usually made from pork, the sausage has a history in Germany dating back to 1313. Bratwurst is perfect kneipe (pub) food, pan-fried and cooked in beer with German classics of potatoes and Rotkohl (red cabbage).

source: tripsavvy.com
Kohlwurst​
Kohlwurst​

Kohlwurst There is a number of German sausages with the word “kohl” (cabbage) in their name, however, they do not contain cabbage in their composition nor they are stuffed in cabbage leaves. They are usually fermented sausages (salami type) simply served with cabbage, peas and beans, kale and potatoes.

image: snipview.com
Landjäger​
Landjäger​

Landjaeger. Such a cool name, eh? It's a German dry-cured sausage that is made small enough to fit into your coat pocket on a cold day hiking, fishing -- or hunting. Thus the name. Traditionally made with beef and pork, my landjaeger is made with venison and pork fat. You could use any red meat -- goat, lamb, elk, etc. This is not a beginner's sausage.

Leberkäse​
Leberkäse​

German Sausage Guide #3: Leberkäse What is Leberkäse? This southern German speciality is a rich, compact meatloaf made from finely ground corned beef, pork, bacon and onions and baked till it forms a dark brown crust.

Thuringian ​Sausage​
Thuringian ​Sausage​

Thuringian sausage, or in German Thüringer Rostbratwurst (short: Roster), is a unique sausage from the German state of Thuringia which has PGI status under EU law.

image: foodal.com
Vienna ​Sausage​
Vienna ​Sausage​

A Vienna sausage (German: Wiener Würstchen, Wiener; Viennese/Austrian German: Frankfurter Würstel or Würstl; Swiss German Wienerli; Swabian: Wienerle or Saitenwurst) is a thin parboiled sausage traditionally made of pork and beef in a casing of sheep's intestine, then given a low temperature smoking.

WestfäLische ​Rinderwurst​
WestfäLische ​Rinderwurst​

Westfälische Rinderwurst is a type of German sausage known as a Grützwurst and is made from beef, beef dripping, vegetables, pearl barley or groats and butter. This Westphalian speciality is served hot, heated in water or roasted, and eaten with bread, boiled potatoes and the like.

image: snipview.com
Wollwurst​
Wollwurst​

Wollwurst is a speciality similar to Weißwurst made from veal and pork. These sausages are also called "Nackerte", "Geschwollene", "Geschlagene" or "Oberländer" and are usually longer and thinner than Weißwürste.