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Types of Gist

“Adult” GIST
“Adult” GIST

For now, we ask that young adult patients, who do not meet the criteria of pediatric GIST, do not concern themselves with the exact definition. We believe that there is a distinction between pediatric GIST and adult GIST.

image: konbini.com
“Pediatric-Like” GIST
“Pediatric-Like” GIST

We have established a separate listserv for these topics: to join link here. Pediatric GIST Summary and Publications. Information on GISTs occurring in children and young adults consists mainly of descriptive individual case reports (see the bibliography on Pediatric GIST on our GIST Bibliography page).

“Wildtype”
“Wildtype”

Pediatric GIST patients (those diagnosed at less than 20 years of age) are Wildtype for KIT and PDGFRA mutations. The SDH gene is located inside the mitochondria of the cell. It is instrumental in converting nutrients to the energy needed by the body.

EGISTs
EGISTs

An inherited form of GIST. A small number of patients inherit the disease from one of their parents. While in other GISTs only some of the body’s cells are affected by the mutation, in familial GIST all of the cells are. The disease has a pediatric form as well. Read more. . . eGISTs. Rare GISTs in which the primary tumor occurs outside of the GI tract.

Familial or Hereditary GIST
Familial or Hereditary GIST

Familial GIST is a hereditary syndrome that increases a person’s risk of developing GIST. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a type of tumor that is found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, gallbladder, liver, small intestine, colon, rectum, and lining of the gut.

source: cancer.net