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Types of Gluons

Antiparticles
Antiparticles

Gluons are particles corresponding to the gauge 4-vector potentials of the strong nuclear force. All gauge 4-vector potentials are real, whereupon the corresponding particles must be their own antiparticles… That is, since gluons carry color—or more precisely, color-anticolor—then the “red-antiblue” gluon is the antiparticle of the ...

source: quora.com
Electroweak Bosons
Electroweak Bosons

A gluon (/ ˈ ɡ l uː ɒ n /) is an elementary particle that acts as the exchange particle (or gauge boson) for the strong force between quarks.It is analogous to the exchange of photons in the electromagnetic force between two charged particles. In layman's terms, they "glue" quarks together, forming protons and neutrons.. In technical terms, gluons are vector gauge bosons that mediate ...

Generations
Generations

The gluon is a vector boson; like the photon, it has a spin of 1. While massive spin-1 particles have three polarization states, massless gauge bosons like the gluon have only two polarization states because gauge invariance requires the polarization to be transverse.

Graviton
Graviton

In theories of quantum gravity, the graviton is the hypothetical elementary particle that mediates the force of gravity. There is no complete quantum field theory of gravitons due to an outstanding mathematical problem with renormalization in general relativity.

Higgs Boson
Higgs Boson

The dominant production mechanism at this mass involves two gluons from each proton fusing to a Top-quark Loop, which couples strongly to the Higgs field to produce a Higgs boson. Left: Diphoton channel: Boson subsequently decays into 2 gamma ray photons by virtual interaction with a W boson loop or top quark loop.

Mass
Mass

The gluon is a made-up particle that supposedly has no rest mass yet it has to keep moving at the speed of light within a nucleon in order to contribute mass.

source: quora.com
Quarks
Quarks

Strange World Of Quarks, Gluons, Described By Physicist Date: February 23, 2008 Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Summary: One of the great theoretical challenges facing physicists is understanding how the tiniest elementary particles give rise to most of the mass in the visible universe.