A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Government Bonds

2Covalent Bond
2Covalent Bond

Ionic and covalent bonds are the two extremes of bonding. Polar covalent is the intermediate type of bonding between the two extremes. Some ionic bonds contain covalent characteristics and some covalent bonds are partially ionic. For example, most carbon-based compounds are covalently bonded but can also be partially ionic. Polarity is a measure of the separation of charge in a compound. A ...

Buying Directly From the US Treasury
Buying Directly From the US Treasury

Treasury Bonds: How To Buy. You can buy Treasury bonds directly from the U.S. Treasury or through a bank, broker, or dealer. Buying Directly From the U.S. Treasury

image: chegg.com
Buying Through a Bank, Broker, or Dealer
Buying Through a Bank, Broker, or Dealer

However, if your bank or broker doesn't provide this service, you can purchase government bonds directly through a government agency. (This is true in most countries). In the U.S. you can buy bonds directly from the federal government through its service,

Corporate Bonds
Corporate Bonds

In Australia, the face value of most corporate bonds is $100. Like other types of debt, bonds may have fixed interest rates that stay the same throughout the life of the bond, or they may have floating rates that change. Why Do Corporations Sell Bonds? Corporate bonds are a form of debt financing.

Foreign Bonds
Foreign Bonds

Some investors have sought to purchase individual foreign government bonds (or sovereign debt) in an effort to obtain greater yield. When a government issues bonds, it borrows money and becomes a debtor. The investors who buy these bonds are the government's lenders or creditors. Individuals ...

High-Yield Bonds
High-Yield Bonds

A high-yield bond is a high paying bond with a lower credit rating than investment-grade corporate bonds, Treasury bonds and municipal bonds. Because of the higher risk of default, these bonds pay a higher yield than investment grade bonds.

Hydrogen Bond
Hydrogen Bond

Hydrogen bonding, interaction involving a hydrogen atom located between a pair of other atoms having a high affinity for electrons; such a bond is weaker than an ionic bond or covalent bond but stronger than van der Waals forces.

Investment-Grade Corporate Bonds
Investment-Grade Corporate Bonds

An investment grade is a rating that indicates that a municipal or corporate bond has a relatively low risk of default. Bond rating firms, such as Standard & Poor's and Moody's, use different designations consisting of upper- and lower-case letters 'A' and 'B' to identify a bond's credit quality rating.

Ionic Bond
Ionic Bond

Ionic bonding is the complete transfer of valence electron(s) between atoms. It is a type of chemical bond that generates two oppositely charged ions. In ionic bonds, the metal loses electrons to become a positively charged cation, whereas the nonmetal accepts those electrons to become a negatively charged anion.

image: socratic.org
Mortgage-Backed Bonds
Mortgage-Backed Bonds

The market has been regulated since the creation of a law governing the securities in Germany in 1900. The key difference between covered bonds and mortgage-backed or asset-backed securities is that banks that make loans and package them into covered bonds keep those loans on their books.

Municipal Bonds
Municipal Bonds

Municipal bonds are debt obligations issued by states, cities, counties and other governmental entities, which use the money to build schools, highways, hospitals, sewer systems, and many other projects for the public good.

Other US Government Bonds
Other US Government Bonds

A government bond is a debt security issued by a government to support government spending. Federal government bonds in the United States include savings bonds, Treasury bonds and Treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS). Before investing in government bonds, investors need to assess several risks associated with the country, such as country risk, political risk, inflation risk and interest rate risk, although the government usually has low credit risk.

Payments and Receipts in TreasuryDirect
Payments and Receipts in TreasuryDirect

USE OF FORM – When original safekeeping custody receipts are not available, use this form to request payment or reissue of United States Savings Bonds/Notes deposited for safekeeping with the Office of the Treasurer of the United States or a Federal Reserve Bank.

Polar Bond
Polar Bond

Ionic bonds form between atoms when the electronegativity difference between them is greater than 1.7. Technically ionic bonds are completely polar bonds, so the terminology can be confusing. Just remember a polar bond refers to a type of covalent bond where electrons aren't equally shared and electronegativity values are slightly different.

source: thoughtco.com
Submit a Bid in TreasuryDirect
Submit a Bid in TreasuryDirect

Once an auction is announced, your institution may submit a bid for the security. You may bid directly through TreasuryDirect (except for Cash Management Bills), TAAPS (with an established account), or you can make arrangements to purchase securities through a broker, dealer, or financial institution.

image: wikihow.com
Treasury Securities
Treasury Securities

A Treasury bond (T-bond) is a marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest payments semi-annually, and the income received is only taxed at the federal level.

Zero-Coupon Bonds
Zero-Coupon Bonds

A zero-coupon bond that is a long-term investment generally has a maturity date that starts around 10 to 15 years. Zero-coupon bonds that are considered short-term investments typically have a maturity that is no more than one year. Such short-term bonds are usually called bills.