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Types of Grains

Barley
Barley

Barley (Hordeum vulgare), a member of the grass family, is a major cereal grain grown in temperate climates globally. It was one of the first cultivated grains, particularly in Eurasia as early as 10,000 years ago.

Broom-Corn
Broom-Corn

Broomcorn brush turns from pale yellow to light green before maturity. It should be harvested when the entire brush is green from the tip down to the base of the peduncle. The fibers will be weak at the bottom if they are harvested while the lower ends are still yellow. The brush often begins to redden and become less flexible about 4 or 5 days after the proper stage for harvesting.

Einkorn Wheat
Einkorn Wheat

Einkorn is a wheat variety that dates back thousands of years and was one of the first cultivated cereal grains. It differs from modern wheats in several ways. It’s higher in protein and is richer in carotenoids.

Emmer
Emmer

Emmer wheat, also known as farro especially in Italy, or hulled wheat,[2] is a type of awned wheat. Emmer is a tetraploid (2n=4x=28 chromosomes).[4] The domesticated species are Triticum turgidum subsp. dicoccum and Triticum turgidum conv. durum.

Freekeh
Freekeh

Freekeh is young green wheat that has been toasted and cracked. It's a healthy whole grain food, much like bulgur wheat and other whole grains. Freekeh is young green wheat that has been toasted and cracked.

Maize
Maize

The maize grain is a major feed grain and a standard component of livestock diets where it is used as a source of energy. Other grains are typically compared to maize when their nutritional value is estimated.

Millet
Millet

Millets are indigenous to many parts of the world. The most widely grown millet is pearl millet, which is an important crop in India and parts of Africa. Finger millet, proso millet, and foxtail millet are also important crop species.

Oat
Oat

Oatmeal is processed using a number of methods, and each method results in a different form of oatmeal. Oat groats are oats in their most wholesome form. They are the largest of the oatmeal choices and take the longest to cook.

Rice
Rice

List of Grain and Grain-Free Foods (Updated 2017) Seed or a Grain? What is Grain Free? Grain Free Living April 10, ... Wild Rice (this one is open to debate ...

Rye
Rye

Rye (Secale cereale) is a grass grown extensively as a grain, a cover crop and a forage crop. It is a member of the wheat tribe (Triticeae) and is closely related to barley (genus Hordeum) and wheat (Triticum). Rye grain is used for flour, rye bread, rye beer, crisp bread, some whiskeys, some vodkas, and animal fodder.

Spelt
Spelt

Spelt (Triticum spelta; Triticum dicoccum), also known as dinkel wheat or hulled wheat, is a species of wheat cultivated since approximately 5000 BC. Spelt was an important staple in parts of Europe from the Bronze Age to medieval times; it now survives as a relict crop in Central Europe and northern Spain, and has also found a new market as a 'health food'.

Wheat
Wheat

Wheat is a grass widely cultivated for its seed, a cereal grain which is a worldwide staple food.[1][2][3] There are many species of wheat which together make up the genus Triticum; the most widely grown is common wheat (T. aestivum).

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