A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Habitat

Cave
Cave

Cave habitats can be divided into three zones: The Twilight Zone This is the area of cave that extends from the entrance to as far as unaided human vision is possible. There is some light. It is damp and cool, but temperature and humidity vary widely. Not surprisingly, this is the area that has the greatest abundance and diversity of life.

Cliff
Cliff

The cliffs are the main characteristic of the area. The general habitat of the cliffs is made up from agricultural land, and a mixture of the above mentioned habitats.

image: alamy.com
Coral Reef
Coral Reef

Coral Reef habitat. Coral Reefs, which are the world's richest marine habitats, occur in shallow, warm waters where the sea temperature is almost always between 18 to 30 degrees centigrade.

Desert
Desert

Desert habitats are incredibly hot and dry places but some animals and plants can survive there! Find out more in this Bitesize Primary KS1 Science guide. Find out more in this Bitesize Primary KS1 Science guide.

source: bbc.co.uk
Fen
Fen

A fen is one of the main types of wetland, the others being grassy marshes, forested swamps, and peaty bogs. Along with bogs, fens are a kind of mire. Fens are minerotrophic peatlands, usually fed by mineral-rich surface water or groundwater.

Forest
Forest

Forests are essential for life on earth. Three hundred million people worldwide live in forests and 1.6 billion depend on them for their livelihoods. Forests also provide habitat for a vast array of plants and animals, many of which are still undiscovered.

Freshwater Marsh
Freshwater Marsh

A freshwater marsh is a marsh that contains fresh water. Freshwater marshes are usually found near the mouths of rivers and are present in areas with low drainage.[1] It is the counterpart to the salt marsh, an upper coastal intertidal zone of bio-habitat which is regularly flushed with sea water.

image: flickr.com
Grassland
Grassland

Grasslands are the most agriculturally useful habitat to humans. Soils tend to be deep and fertile, perfect for cropland or pastures. Much of the North American prairielands have been converted into one of the richest agricultural regions on Earth.

Intertidal Zone
Intertidal Zone

The intertidal zone is the area between the highest tide and lowest tide marks. This habitat is covered with water at high tide, and exposed to air at low tide. The land in this zone can be rocky, sandy or covered in mudflats.

source: thoughtco.com
Salt Marsh
Salt Marsh

Salt marsh within Narragansett Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. Salt marshes are coastal wetlands which are flooded and drained by tides. Salt marshes are coastal wetlands that are flooded and drained by salt water brought in by the tides. They are marshy because the soil may be composed of deep mud and peat.

Savanna
Savanna

A savanna or savannah is a mixed woodland grassland ecosystem characterised by the trees being sufficiently widely spaced so that the canopy does not close. The open canopy allows sufficient light to reach the ground to support an unbroken herbaceous layer consisting primarily of grasses.

Sea Cave
Sea Cave

Quick Answer. A sea cave, also called a littoral cave, begins as a small crack or weak spot in a cliff beside the sea. Ocean waves – salty water full of gravel and sand pound against this spot for centuries, slowly enlarging it and hollowing out a cave in the side of the cliff.

source: reference.com
Shrubland
Shrubland

Maintain Existing Shrubland Habitat. Natural processes can help maintain shrubland habitats. Allowing for the natural abandonment of beaver dams, and where possible, use of prescribed fire will help maintain some shrubland habitats. Larger shrublands (>5 acres) provide a better buffer against predation than smaller ones.

image: ct.gov
Tundra
Tundra

Tundra ecosystems are treeless regions found in the Arctic and on the tops of mountains, where the climate is cold and windy and rainfall is scant. Tundra lands are snow-covered for much of the year, until summer brings a burst of wildflowers.

Wetland
Wetland

A wetland is a place where the land is covered by water, either salt, fresh or somewhere in between. Marshes and ponds, the edge of a lake or ocean, the delta at the mouth of a river, low-lying areas that frequently flood—all of these are wetlands. The destruction of wetlands is a concern because they are some of the most productive habitats on the planet.

image: westenv.net

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