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Types of Haemorrhage

Epidural Hematoma
Epidural Hematoma

Epidural hematoma is when bleeding occurs between the tough outer membrane covering the brain (dura mater), and the skull. Often there is loss of consciousness following a head injury, a brief regaining of consciousness, and then loss of consciousness again.

Hemophilia A
Hemophilia A

Hemophilia A, also called factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency or classic hemophilia, is a genetic disorder caused by missing or defective factor VIII, a clotting protein. Although it is passed down from parents to children, about 1/3 of cases are caused by a spontaneous mutation, a change in a gene.

Hemophilia B
Hemophilia B

Moderate hemophilia B. 1% up to 5% of FIX in the blood. People with moderate hemophilia B tend to have bleeding episodes after injuries. Bleeds that occur without obvious cause are called spontaneous bleeding episodes. Severe hemophilia B. <1% of FIX in the blood.

image: pixshark.com
Intracerebral Hemorrhage
Intracerebral Hemorrhage

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is when blood suddenly bursts into brain tissue, causing damage to your brain. Symptoms usually appear suddenly during ICH. They include headache, weakness, confusion, and paralysis, particularly on one side of your body. The buildup of blood puts pressure on your ...

Other Factor Deficiencies
Other Factor Deficiencies

Other Factor Deficiencies In the US, a rare disease or disorder is defined as one that affects fewer than 200,000 people, making hemophilia A and B, and still less prevalent factor deficiencies such as I, II, V, VII, X, XI, XII and XIII, rare disorders.

Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) refers to bleeding within the subarachnoid space, which is the area between the brain and the tissues that cover the brain. The subarachnoid space is the space where the cerebrospinal fluid circulates, and it’s responsible for protecting your brain from injury by serving as a cushion.

image: dxline.info
Subdural Hematoma
Subdural Hematoma

The bleeding in a subdural hematoma is under the skull and outside the brain, not in the brain itself. As blood accumulates, however, pressure on the brain increases. The pressure on the brain causes a subdural hematoma's symptoms.

source: webmd.com
Von Willebrand Disease
Von Willebrand Disease

Rarely, von Willebrand disease can develop later in life in people who didn't inherit an abnormal gene from a parent. This is known as acquired von Willebrand disease, and it's likely caused by another medical condition. Von Willebrand disease has several types: Type 1.