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Types of Hardwood

Cedar
Cedar

Hardwood vs. Softwood Density The denser a wood is, the harder, stronger, and more durable it is. Most hardwoods have a higher density than most softwoods. The chart below shows the density of some commonly used woods.

source: diffen.com
Coast Redwood
Coast Redwood

Redwood Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens). Common Name(s): Redwood, Sequoia, Coast Redwood, California Redwood, Vavona (burl). Scientific Name: Sequoia sempervirens. Distribution: Coastal northwestern United States (from southwestern Oregon to central California). Tree Size: 200-300 ft (60-90 m) tall, 6-12 ft (1.8-3.7 m) trunk diameter.

Cupressaceae
Cupressaceae

Cypress has tropical oils in it that aide in rot resistance. I found the answer is to use shellac as a sealer first, and then poly as your top coats.

English Yew
English Yew

English yew tree may be the most elegant softwood. Displaying an array of colors from amber to pink, yew tree’s tones continue to develop as they age, getting richer and richer. Yew tree at its best can also be found with pip or eye.

Fir
Fir

Uses of Hardwood vs Softwood. In many cases, hardwoods and softwoods are both used for many of the same purposes, with more emphasis placed on the type of hardwood or softwood and how dense it is. Generally, though, softwoods are cheaper and easier to work with than hardwoods.

source: diffen.com
Hemlocks
Hemlocks

Today hemlock lumber from Oregon, ... Ease of machining and finishing have made hemlock an increasingly popular alternative to hardwood for furniture and cabinets.

image: houzz.com
Monkey Puzzles
Monkey Puzzles

Recently cut monkey puzzle tree. Max May 5, 2014 at 12:55 pm - Reply As I have seen, the common name of the species may be derived from the actual appearance of the bark, which tends to peel off leaving patches of vibrant color.

Phyllocladus Aspleniifolius
Phyllocladus Aspleniifolius

Phyllocladus aspleniifolius. Phyllocladus aspleniifolius, commonly known as the celerytop pine, is an endemic gymnosperm of Tasmania, Australia. It is widespread and common in Tasmania, with the most abundance in the western highlands. Its ‘leaves’ appear similar to those of a celery plant, hence the common name.