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Types of Hardwood Floors

Ash
Ash

Graining is bold and can appear straight, curly or wavy. Ash flooring is very similar to White Oak, but adds a bit more excitement to a room with its more unique graining. A few popular Ash products include Kahrs Ash Kalmar, Kahrs Ash Vaila and Vintage Hardwood Flooring Wirebrushed Ash.

Bamboo Bamboo Flooring
Bamboo Bamboo Flooring

Bamboo is a natural surface covering material that has many of the properties of hardwood flooring, even though it is actually produced from a type of grass. It shares many of the positive benefits of a hardwood floor, as well as the drawbacks and vulnerabilities.

source: thespruce.com
image: lowes.com
Beech
Beech

Even though beech wood flooring is relatively hard and durable, it is still a wood product, and it can be damaged. Preventative maintenance and routine care are necessary in order to retain the natural beauty of this flooring.

image: fordaq.com
Cork Cork Flooring
Cork Cork Flooring

Well not only is the process of harvesting the cork non-detrimental to the tree, but in addition, because cork flooring uses the left over scrap after cork stoppers are punched out, it’s actually doubly green as the material is recycled to make the flooring.

image: lowes.com
Engineered Hardwood Engineered Flooring
Engineered Hardwood Engineered Flooring

Shaw Engineered Hardwood Flooring Shaw's Engineered hardwood core is made up of multiple layers of wood stacked in a cross-grain configuration which minimizes expanding and shrinking. Like EPIC® Plus Engineered hardwood, Shaw Engineered can be installed above, on, or below grade.

Fibreboard
Fibreboard

Also referred to as hardboard, a high density fiberboard (HDF) for flooring is a type of engineered wood product. It’s made from wood fiber extracted from chips and pulped wood waste. HDF for flooring is similar but much harder and denser than particle board or medium density fiberboard (MDF) for flooring.

Laminate
Laminate

Laminate: PROS – Laminate wood flooring is made from composite wood pressed together at high temperatures. The image of hardwood is then placed over the composite wood, covering it to form the laminate. Not only are the materials themselves cheaper, but laminate wood installation cost is, on average, 50 percent less than hardwood installation.

source: freshome.com
Laminate Flooring
Laminate Flooring

Hardwood: CONS – Hardwood flooring is made of harvested trees; pricing depends on how exotic the trees are. In general, hardwood is considerably higher to buy and to install. Laminate: PROS – Laminate wood flooring is made from composite wood pressed together at high temperatures.

source: freshome.com
Linoleum Flooring
Linoleum Flooring

A leader in resilient flooring, Armstrong Flooring’s LinoArt sheet and tile linoleum flooring begins sustainable and remains sustainable. Naturally insulating and with light-reflective colors, LinoArt linoleum can help reduce energy used for heating, cooling and lighting.

Mahogany
Mahogany

Mahogany and oak flooring are strong, solid hardwood options that offer beauty, luxury and durability in a flooring design. Oak flooring is primarily a domestic variety and is harvested in the United States, but mahogany is an exotic wood species that must be imported.

Maple
Maple

Durability of Maple Wood Flooring Strong, durable and resistant to wear and tear, Maple performs beautifully in any room that gets a lot of living. Like most natural wood floors, it can add value to a home — and since it's an extremely durable species, it can last for generations with proper care.

Oak
Oak

Oak hardwood floors are available in either solid hardwood or engineered wood construction. The layered structure of engineered hardwood makes it an excellent choice for areas where solid hardwood cannot be installed, like in basements, over concrete floors or over radiant heating systems.

Pine
Pine

Shop our selection of Pine, Solid Hardwood in the Flooring Department at The Home Depot.

source: homedepot.com
Solid Hardwood Hardwood Flooring
Solid Hardwood Hardwood Flooring

Shaw Solid Hardwood Flooring Diagram - Solid wood is milled from a single 3/4" thick piece of hardwood. Solid wood flooring expands and contracts with changes in your home's relative humidity. Normally, installers compensate for this movement by leaving an expansion gap between the floor and the wall.

Stone Flooring
Stone Flooring

Unfinished hardwood flooring is a good option if you want a custom stain applied before the final finish, or if you want to match the color of existing flooring. After hardwood flooring installation and staining, the flooring is given several coats of protective finish. If you’re thinking of adding hardwood flooring in your kitchen, unfinished flooring is a good choice because the finish will penetrate and seal the seams between boards, helping to prevent water from seeping between boards.

Tile Flooring
Tile Flooring

It's gorgeous, natural-looking and it combines all the beauty of wood with the durability of tile. That means you can give any room the elegant look of hardwood, especially in high-moisture areas like kitchens, bathrooms and even wall backsplashes!

Vinyl Flooring
Vinyl Flooring

Vinyl wood flooring refers to vinyl that has been printed with the colors and markings found in natural hardwood. Recent advances in printing technology now allow vinyl products to accurately simulate the look of a variety of wood species.

source: thespruce.com
Walnut
Walnut

Walnut is a naturally softer hardwood, so it's important to consider the amount of traffic in the room where you plan to install it. Many factors go into the durability of Walnut flooring though, including the level of protection offered by the finish.

Wood Flooring
Wood Flooring

Unfinished hardwood flooring is a good option if you want a custom stain applied before the final finish, or if you want to match the color of existing flooring. After hardwood flooring installation and staining, the flooring is given several coats of protective finish.

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