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Types of Hearing Impairment

Aging (Presbycusis)
Aging (Presbycusis)

Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is the loss of hearing that gradually occurs in most of us as we grow older. It is one of the most common conditions affecting older and elderly adults. Approximately one in three people in the United States between the ages of 65 and 74 has hearing loss, and nearly half of those older than 75 have difficulty hearing.

Auditory Processing Disorders
Auditory Processing Disorders

Hearing impairment and auditory processing disorders can look very similar on the surface. To understand the difference, it helps to know what hearing is. We learn as kids that hearing is one of the five senses. But it’s a complex process—picking up sound and attaching meaning to it.

Autoimmune Inner ear Disease
Autoimmune Inner ear Disease

Autoimmune inner ear disease (AIED) is a syndrome of progressive hearing loss and/or dizziness that is caused by antibodies or immune cells which are attacking the inner ear. In most cases, there is reduction of hearing accompanied by tinnitus (ringing, hissing, roaring) which occurs over a few months.

Conductive
Conductive

Conductive hearing loss occurs when there is a problem conducting sound waves anywhere along the route through the outer ear, tympanic membrane (eardrum), or middle ear . This type of hearing loss may occur in conjunction with sensorineural hearing loss (mixed hearing loss) or alone.

Conductive Hearing Loss
Conductive Hearing Loss

When hearing aids are not enough, this type of hearing loss can be surgically treated with cochlear implants. Mixed Hearing Loss Mixed hearing loss is caused by a combination of conductive damage in the outer or middle ear and sensorineural damage in the inner ear (cochlea) or auditory nerve.

Exposure to Loud Noise
Exposure to Loud Noise

Sometimes exposure to impulse or continuous loud noise causes a temporary hearing loss that disappears 16 to 48 hours later. Recent research suggests, however, that although the loss of hearing seems to disappear, there may be residual long-term damage to your hearing.

source: nidcd.nih.gov
Head Trauma
Head Trauma

Generally, although not always, in cases with post-traumatic dizziness or hearing loss there is signs of head injury -- a skull fracture being the most obvious, but also bruises, swelling, abrasions are seen in head injuries that are associated with hearing loss or tinnitus.

Heredity
Heredity

Genetic factors also make some people more susceptible to hearing loss than others. Their genes make them more predisposed to hearing loss due to ageing or induced by noise, drugs or infections. It is estimated that the causes of age-related hearing loss are 35-55% genetic.

source: hear-it.org
image: amazon.com
Malformation of the Inner ear
Malformation of the Inner ear

About 25% of patients with congenital hearing loss will have bony inner ear malformations (Mafong et al, 2002). The normal cochlea has two and one-half turns. A cochlear malformation consists of a membranous abnormality, a bony abnormality, or a combination of these two.

Ménière's Disease
Ménière's Disease

Menieres Disease is a long term, progressive condition that affects the hearing and balance parts of the inner ear. It has three main components that make up the disease. Hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo (not to be confused with a dizzy spell).

Mixed Hearing Loss
Mixed Hearing Loss

A mixed hearing loss is a combination of a conductive hearing loss and a sensorineural hearing loss. Definition of mixed hearing loss Sometimes a conductive hearing loss occurs in combination with a sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). When this is the case, it is called a mixed hearing loss. In other words, with a mixed hearing loss there is at ...

source: hear-it.org
Sensorineural
Sensorineural

If you want to understand your own hearing loss, or anyone else’s hearing, there are a number of questions you need to consider. How severe is your hearing loss? This is the simplest and most frequently used way of describing a hearing loss.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural Hearing Loss

Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a type of hearing loss, or deafness, in which the root cause lies in the inner ear or sensory organ (cochlea and associated structures) or the vestibulocochlear nerve (cranial nerve VIII).

Virus or Disease
Virus or Disease

Surgery may reverse hearing loss caused by otosclerosis, scar tissue, or infection, while Ménière's disease is sometimes treatable with medication and a different diet. Hearing loss caused by infection can often be cleared up with antibiotics. If you think your hearing loss stems from medication use, talk with your doctor about drug options.

source: webmd.com

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