A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Heart

Abnormal Heart Rhythms, or Arrhythmias
Abnormal Heart Rhythms, or Arrhythmias

Doctors mainly use ICDs to treat ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, two life-threatening heart rhythms. The ICD constantly tracks the heart rhythm. When it detects a very fast, abnormal heart rhythm, it delivers an electric shock to the heart muscle to cause the heart to beat in a normal rhythm again.

source: webmd.com
Angina
Angina

Angina (an-JI-nuh or AN-juh-nuh) is chest pain or discomfort that occurs if an area of your heart muscle doesn't get enough oxygen-rich blood. Angina may feel like pressure or squeezing in your chest.

source: nhlbi.nih.gov
Congenital Heart Disease
Congenital Heart Disease

"Congenital heart defect" is another way of saying your heart had a problem when you were born. You may have had a small hole in it or something more severe. Although these can be very serious conditions, many can be treated with surgery.

source: webmd.com
Coronary Artery Disease
Coronary Artery Disease

However, coronary heart disease , or CHD, is actually a result of coronary artery disease, or CAD, said Edward A. Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., an American Heart Association volunteer who is the Leon H. Charney Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine and also of the Marc and Ruti Bell Vascular Biology and Disease Program at the NYU School of Medicine.

source: heart.org
Coronary Artery Disease (Narrowing of the Arteries)
Coronary Artery Disease (Narrowing of the Arteries)

Coronary artery disease, also called coronary heart disease, or simply, heart disease, affects millions of Americans. This serious condition is a result of plaque buildup in your arteries. What Is Coronary Artery Disease? The arteries, which start out smooth and elastic, get plaque on their inner walls, which can make them more rigid and narrowed.

source: webmd.com
Coronary Spasm, or Unstable Angina
Coronary Spasm, or Unstable Angina

This can narrow and decrease or even completely prevent blood flow to part of the heart muscle. If the spasm lasts long enough, it can lead to chest pain (angina) and even a heart attack (myocardial infarction). These spasms are sometimes referred to as Prinzmetal's angina or variant angina.

Fatigue and Weakness
Fatigue and Weakness

Also, fatigue can be a normal response to physical and mental activity; in most normal individuals it is quickly relieved (usually in hours to about a day, depending on the intensity of the activity) by reducing the activity. Fatigue is a very common complaint and it is important to remember that it is a symptom and not a disease.

Heart Attack
Heart Attack

After a heart attack, quick treatment to open the blocked artery is essential to lessen the amount of damage. At the first signs of a heart attack, call for emergency treatment (usually 911). The best time to treat a heart attack is within one to two hours of the first onset of symptoms.

source: webmd.com
Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction)
Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction)

This is a heart attack, otherwise known as a myocardial infarction -- literally, "death of heart muscle." Most heart attacks occur during several hours -- so never wait to seek help if you think a heart attack is beginning.

source: webmd.com
Heart Failure
Heart Failure

Actually, heart failure means that the heart isn't pumping as well as it should be. Congestive heart failure is a type of heart failure which requires seeking timely medical attention, although sometimes the two terms are used interchangeably.

source: heart.org
Heart Muscle Disease (Cardiomyopathy)
Heart Muscle Disease (Cardiomyopathy)

Noncompaction cardiomyopathy, also called spongiform cardiomyopathy, is a rare disease present at birth. It results from abnormal development of the heart muscle in the womb. Diagnosis may occur at any stage of life.

Heart Valve Disease
Heart Valve Disease

In heart valve disease, one or more of the valves in your heart doesn't work properly. Your heart has four valves that keep blood flowing in the correct direction. In some cases, one or more of the valves don't open or close properly.

non-ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (NSTEMI)
non-ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (NSTEMI)

Non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are both commonly known as heart attack. NSTEMI is the less common of the two, accounting for around 30 percent of all heart attacks. NSTEMI, STEMI, and a third condition called unstable angina are all forms of acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

Rapid or Irregular Heartbeat
Rapid or Irregular Heartbeat

Atrial fibrillation is a very common irregular heart rhythm that causes the atria, the upper chambers of the heart, to contract abnormally. Atrial flutter. This is an arrhythmia caused by one or more rapid circuits in the atrium.

Reduced Ability to Exercise
Reduced Ability to Exercise

HeartSmart: Information on Pets with Heart Disease Symptoms Diagnostic Tests Treatments Diet Management At-home Monitoring Exercise Make an Appointment Reduced ability to exercise—exercise intolerance—weakness, fatigue and lethargy are occasional complaints for animals with heart disease.

Shortness of Breath
Shortness of Breath

If your heart can’t pump blood well (as is the case with a heart attack), you can feel short of breath. Shortness of breath can sometimes be an accompanying symptom to unusual fatigue in women. For example, some women report they would get unusually short of breath and tired for the activity they were performing.

Silent Ischemia
Silent Ischemia

What is ischemia? Ischemia is a condition in which the blood flow (and thus oxygen) is restricted or reduced in a part of the body. Cardiac ischemia is the name for decreased blood flow and oxygen to the heart muscle. What is ischemic heart disease? It's the term given to heart problems caused by narrowed heart arteries.

source: heart.org
ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI)
ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI)

ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is the term cardiologists use to describe a classic heart attack. It is one type of myocardial infarction in which a part of the heart muscle (myocardium) has died due to the obstruction of blood supply to the area.

Swelling
Swelling

Other things can help discover an enlarged heart, such as: Your history: Shortness of breath or other symptoms of congestive heart failure may provide clues. A physical exam: You may have swelling. An enlarged heart can also produce abnormal sounds when a doctor listens with a stethoscope.

source: webmd.com